In the Spotlight

Spieth Helps Warriors Get in the Zone

The Jordan Spieth Family Foundation has joined the effort to assist veterans encountering a difficult transition. It is underwriting the Jordan Spieth Family Foundation Training Room at the new state-of-the-art Brain Performance Institute™ facility that is part of the Center for BrainHealth. The Foundation has also set up an endowment to help support Warrior Training at no cost to veterans and active-duty military, as well as military spouses and caregivers.
By: The Center for BrainHealth

Linz Award winner Lyda Hill wants all Dallas residents to experience the joy of service 

Philanthropist Lyda Hill received the Linz Award, one of Dallas' oldest and most prestigious civic honors, for her dedication to making the city a better place. A gift from Hill to the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas will allow 500 police officers to take part in the Center's high-performance brain training program, Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training.

Center for BrainHealth and Dallas Police Department Partner to Advance Brain Health of Police Officers

Law enforcement is inherently a high-pressure profession. Police officers must routinely make tough decisions, often under extreme stress and/or facing threat of harm. The Center for BrainHealth, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, and its Brain Performance Institute are collaborating to provide programs to help officers who serve on the front lines of the city of Dallas.
By: The Center for BrainHealth

Protect Your Brain for Life: Follow these expert strategies

Dr. Chapman shares expert advice on how to protect your brain across the lifespan in a recent Neurology Now article.

Featured Profiles

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Cindy Samuelson, MS

Assistant Director, Sponsored Research Projects

Treashure Hardin

Accountant I

Sarah Bishop, M.S.

Research Assistant

Shikha Prashad, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Research Scientist

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From Our Blog

What the ability to “get the gist” says about your brain

Many who have a chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) report struggling to solve problems, understand complex information and maintain friendships, despite scoring normally on cognitive tests. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas finds that a gist reasoning test, developed by clinicians and cognitive neuroscientists at the Center, is more sensitive than other traditional tests at identifying certain cognitive deficits.

Stress can make your brain stronger if you know this

According to an article in JAMA Internal Medicine, stress is at least partially to blame for 60 to 80 percent of primary care visits. Studies show that those who suffer from chronic, severe stress are more likely to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease later in life. However, there are interesting caveats. Not all people who have experienced excessive amounts of stress are worse off, mentally or physically than those who have not.

In the News

Protect Your Brain for Life: Follow these expert strategies

Dr. Chapman shares expert advice on how to protect your brain across the lifespan in a recent Neurology Now article.

What the ability to ‘get the gist’ says about your brain

New research finds that a gist reasoning test, developed by clinicians and cognitive neuroscientists, is more sensitive than other traditional tests at identifying certain cognitive deficits.

BrainHealth® is a registered service mark of The University of Texas at Dallas