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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Inspiring Human Brain Potential: RGK Foundation

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Advancing knowledge and realizing the human potential is at the core of the RGK Foundation's mission to improve society. "RGK Foundation recognizes brain science's immense capacity to transform individual health and productivity when translated into life-improving programs," said Gregory A. Kozmetsky, Chairman of RGK Foundation. "The Center for BrainHealth has developed solutions that are truly transformative, and we are excited to be collaborating with the Center on several fronts."

Based in Austin, TX, the RGK Foundaiton is an independent foundation that was established by Ronya and George Kozmetsky in 1966. Aaron, the founders' grandson, and his wife Tracey live in Dallas and have been contributing their personal gives of time, talent and funds to the Center for the last several years. A proponent of the Center's high performance brain training program called Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training (SMART), Tracey explained her enthusiasm, "If you apply the Center's high performance brain training strategies, you will really see a difference in how your brain functions on a daily basis. Adopting the skills has helped me think more strategically, more creatively and more meaningfully." She added, "The principles span generations and apply to every lifestyle. We are able to incorporate them with our teenage children, our parents and in our professional and personal endeavors."

In its most recent grant to the Center for BrainHealth, the RGK Foundation donated $500,000 to expand two existing higher performance brain training initiatives in Austin, San Antonio, and the greater Central Texas area.

The programs will be delivered through the Center for BrainHeatlh's translational arm, the Brain Performance Institute. One initiative, known as Warrior SMART, is tailored to empower current and former military service members on and off the battlefiled. The other initative, called Adolescent SMART, focuses on helping middle school students reach their full academic and personal potential.

"These programs target populations dear to the foundation's heart: those who honor our country service in the military and our nation's youth," said Aaron Kozmetsky.

"The continued expansion of the Adolescent SMART program is important for advancing the Center's goal to increase student achievement and reasoning ability, regardless of socioeconomic status, in diverse communities," explained Jacquelyn Gamino, Ph.D., director of the Adolescent Reasoning Initiative

As a kick-off to the RGK Foundation sponsored initiative, teachers from Central Texas School districts have traveled to the Center for BrainHealth this summer to learn how to implement SMART in their middle school classrooms. RGK funds will also support a regional liaison in Austin who will help the Adolescent Reasoning Dallas-based team maintain the SMART program's fidelity and collect research data.   

RGK Foundation support for Warrior SMART began by deploying brain training teams to Texas State Technical College in Waco and The University of Texas at San Antonio where there are large veteran student populations. 

"We are grateful for RGK's support in this strategic move that helped us reach an area with one of the highest concentrations of veterans and active-duty service members in the United States," said Matthew Neyland, head of the Warrior Training Team and former U.S. Marine Corps Officer. "Our training leverages leadership and strategic thinking skills learned in the military, bridging the transition from the battlefiled to civilian life."

"We are deeply grateful to The RGK Foundation and the Kozmetsky family," said Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D., the Center's founder and chief director. "They are truly agents of change pushing forward better brain health for all."                                        

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Study: Marijuana Dependence Alters the Brain’s Response to Drug Paraphernalia | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Study: Marijuana Dependence Alters the Brain’s Response to Drug Paraphernalia

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas demonstrates that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users.

The study, published July 1 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, demonstrated that different areas of the brain activated when dependent and non-dependent users were exposed to drug-related cues.

The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health shows marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States. According to a 2013 survey from the Pew Research Center, 48 percent of Americans ages 18 and older have tried marijuana. The National Institute on Drug Abuse states that 9 percent of daily users will become dependent on marijuana.

“We know that people have a hard time staying abstinent because seeing cues for the drug use triggers this intense desire to seek out the drugs,” said Dr. Francesca Filbey, lead author of the study and professor at the Center for BrainHealth in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. “That’s a clinically validated phenomenon and behavioral studies have also shown this to be the case. What we didn’t know was what was driving those effects in the brain.”

To find this effect, Filbey and colleagues conducted brain-imaging scans, called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), on 71 participants who regularly used marijuana. Just more than half of those were classified as dependent users. While being scanned, the participants were given either a used marijuana pipe or a pencil of approximately the same size that they could see and feel.

A comparison of the images revealed that the nucleus accumbens, the reward region in the brain, was activated in all users in response to the pipe. However, the strengths of the connections with other areas differed between dependent and non-dependent users.

“We found that the reward network is actually being driven by other areas unrelated to reward, like the areas in memory and attention or emotion,” Filbey said.

Non-dependent users showed greater activations in the orbital frontal cortex and hippocampus, suggesting that memory and attention were connected to the activation of the reward network. Dependent users had greater activations in the amygdala and anterior cingulate gyrus, suggesting a more emotional connection. Additionally, the areas of the brain activated resemble areas activated for other addictions, such as nicotine or cocaine, lending greater support to the addictiveness of marijuana.

These findings suggest that marijuana abuse intervention needs to cater more specifically to a user’s level of addiction.

"Clinicians treating people with problems with marijuana dependence should consider the different processes that trigger the reward response when determining possible pharmacological or behavioral interventions,” Filbey said.

Dr. Joseph Dunlop, researcher at UT Dallas, also worked on the study. Research was conducted in part at the Mind Research Network and was funded by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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Center for BrainHealth’s Young Professionals Group Raises $50,000 for Autism Research | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Center for BrainHealth’s Young Professionals Group Raises $50,000 for Autism Research

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The Think Ahead Group (TAG), the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas’ young professionals group, has awarded $50,000 to help individuals with autism achieve more socially engaged lives and advantageous futures.   

“According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in 68 American children are on the autism spectrum, “ explained Tandra Allen, M.S., who is the lead clinician on the Center’s social cognition project. “Those diagnosed experience social cognition difficulties, or challenges with communication, social interaction and learning. Through our virtual reality training program, we provide a realistic, safe, no-fail environment to experience situations that are often difficult for those on the autism spectrum.”

Combining proven training methods with the latest in virtual reality face-emotion tracking software, the Center for BrainHealth’s program immerses participants in a virtual city -- complete with a coffee shop, apartment complex, movie theatre, grocery store, office building, playground, basketball court and school. Research utilizing the program shows documented improvements in recognizing emotions, understanding the intentions of others, and being able to respond appropriately in various social situations including job interviews, academic settings, and dating.

“Video games are fun, and this is therapy disguised as a high-tech game with state-of-the-art graphics, real-time face tracking and personalized avatars. Participants don’t realize that while they are having fun, their brains are changing to positively affect future real-world scenarios,” said Carl Lutz, head of Center for BrainHealth’s Virtual Reality Lab.

Until recently the program was only available to those research participants who were able to come to the Center for BrainHealth or visit the Child Study Center at Yale University Yale School of Medicine who is collaborating with the team at the Center.

TAG’s funding will support the development and expansion of the current program to a wider, in-home audience. The grant will allow Center for BrainHealth clinicians to provide remote training opportunities via laptops that have been outfitted with the virtual reality program. The funds will also supply portable technology components, such as a web-cam, that will be shipped to participants and mailed back with the laptop when the training is complete.

“With this gift, we will be able to reach those who cannot physically visit the Center for BrainHealth but who can still be positively impacted by this virtual environment,” said Allen. “We have seen so many inspiring success stories with those who have completed the 10-session program at the Center, but it has been heartbreaking to have to turn away people due to geographic limitations. Now we will be able to reach many more people of all ages on the autism spectrum.”

“As young professionals in Dallas, we are keenly aware that brain health affects everyone and every generation,” said TAG president, Dan Harris. “We are very proud to be able to reach diverse populations through the Center for BrainHealth’s life-changing programs. This year we are focusing on individuals with autism, but in previous years, grants have supported initiatives for military veterans as well as older adults facing mild cognitive impairment.”  

Since TAG’s inception in 2009, the group has raised more than $360,000 in support of Center for BrainHealth research. The majority of funds are amassed via their annual Kentucky Derby Party, which was chaired this year by Katie Bivins and Halley Homen and sponsored by Sewell Automotive Companies. About 300 people attended the benefit held on May 3 at Dallas Arboretum’s DeGolyer Mansion.

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Bipolar Study Seeks to Add Side-Effect Free Approach to Brain Disorder | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Bipolar Study Seeks to Add Side-Effect Free Approach to Brain Disorder

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Bipolar disorder is one of the most prevalent manic-depressive illnesses affecting approximately 5.7 million adult Americans every year. It causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and hinders the ability to carry out daily tasks. Although it cannot be cured, it can be treated effectively. A new Center for BrainHealth study will investigate the effects of the Center’s high performance brain training program called SMART on the mental health and cognitive performance of individuals who have been diagnosed with the disorder.

The study is being funded by friends of the Center, Debbie and Bill Dunlap. “We realize that individuals with bipolar disorder are often very bright and creative,” explained Debbie Dunlap. “We want to help maximize their potential. Our desire is to see them achieve greater success in life through the SMART program.” Although not previously studied in bipolar disorder, SMART has been scientifically proven in several populations including healthy aging adults, those with traumatic brain injury and teenagers. This novel pilot study will measure changes in cognition, real life functionality, and brain imaging data. Erin Venza, M.S. CCC-SLP, the clinician spearheading the study, explained, “Working memory and attention are common complaints in individuals with bipolar disorder. We believe that this training will greatly enhance cognitive and neural functioning in this group of adults and also incite white matter generation.”

If you or someone you know may be interested in participating in the study, please click here for more information.

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Study finds cognitive performance can be improved in teens months,years after traumatic brain injury | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Study finds cognitive performance can be improved in teens months,years after traumatic brain injury

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Traumatic brain injuries from sports, recreational activities, falls or car accidents are the leading cause of death and disability in children and adolescents. While previously it was believed that the window for brain recovery was at most one year after injury, new research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online today in the open-access journal Frontiers in Neurology shows cognitive performance can be improved to significant degrees months, and even years, after injury, given targeted brain training.

"The after-effects of concussions and more severe brain injuries can be very different and more detrimental to a developing child or adolescent brain than an adult brain," said Dr. Lori Cook, study author and director of the Center for BrainHealth's pediatric brain injury programs. "While the brain undergoes spontaneous recovery in the immediate days, weeks, and months following a brain injury, cognitive deficits may continue to evolve months to years after the initial brain insult when the brain is called upon to perform higher-order reasoning and critical thinking tasks."

Twenty adolescents, ages 12-20 who experienced a traumatic brain injury at least six months prior to participating in the research and were demonstrating gist reasoning deficits, or the inability to "get the essence" from dense information, were enrolled in the study. The participants were randomized into two different cognitive training groups – strategy-based gist reasoning training versus fact-based memory training.

Participants completed eight, 45-minute sessions over a one-month period. Researchers compared the effects of the two forms of training on the ability to abstract meaning and recall facts. Testing included pre- and post-training assessments, in which adolescents were asked to read several texts and then craft a high-level summary, drawing upon inferences to transform ideas into novel, generalized statements, and recall important facts.

After training, only the gist-reasoning group showed significant improvement in the ability to abstract meanings – a foundational cognitive skill to everyday life functionality. Additionally, the gist-reasoning-trained group showed significant generalized gains to untrained areas including executive functions of working memory (i.e., holding information in mind for use – such as performing mental addition or subtraction ) and inhibition (i.e., filtering out irrelevant information). The gist-reasoning training group also demonstrated increased memory for facts, even though this skill was not specifically targeted in training.

"These preliminary results are promising in that higher-order cognitive training that focuses on 'big picture' thinking improves cognitive performance in ways that matter to everyday life success," said Dr. Cook. "What we found was that training higher-order cognitive skills can have a positive impact on untrained key executive functions as well as lower-level, but also important, processes such as straightforward memory, which is used to remember details. While the study sample was small and a larger trial is needed, the real-life application of this training program is especially important for adolescents who are at a very challenging life-stage when they face major academic and social complexities. These cognitive challenges require reasoning, filtering, focusing, planning, self-regulation, activity management and combating 'information overload,' which is one of the chief complaints that teens with concussions express."

This research advances best practices by implicating changes to common treatment schedules for traumatic brain injury and concussion. The ability to achieve cognitive gains through a brain training treatment regimen at chronic stages of brain injury (6 months or longer) supports the need to monitor brain recovery annually and offer treatment when deficits persist or emerge later.

"Brain injuries require routine follow-up monitoring. We need to make sure that optimized brain recovery continues to support later cognitive milestones, and that is especially true in the case of adolescents," said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, study author, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair at The University of Texas at Dallas. "What's promising is that no matter the severity of the injury or the amount of time since injury, brain performance improved when teens were taught how to strategically process incoming information in a meaningful way, instead of just focusing on rote memorization."

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Know Science. No Stigma. | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Know Science. No Stigma.

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, May 8, 2014

Tina Bass, M.S., LPC is part of the Center for BrainHealth’s post traumatic stress disorder research team that is investigating new interventions to help returning service members. She shares her thoughts below on ending the stigma associated with mental health issues and post traumatic stress disorder. To learn more about the Center’s work with military service members, click here. For more information about our post traumatic stress disorder study, in particular, click here.

Bipolar. Anxiety. Schizophrenia. Depression. Post traumatic stress disorder. Matters of mental health often carry negative connotations and stigmas that are furthered by lack of public awareness, inaccurate knowledge, limited understanding of the realities of mental health issues and personal and societal fear.

Broadly de-stigmatizing mental health issues and post traumatic stress disorder, in particular, will require a long-term, sustained effort. A first step is knowing the science.

Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is defined as the failure of the natural recovery process to unusual stress or trauma. Sustained symptoms can be the outcome of experiencing an event or series of events that are life threatening or can cause serious injury to an individual or others close to the individual. This often results in feeling intense fear, horror, or feeling an inability to control what is happening. Almost all individuals who are exposed to these types of situations have to cope with some of the 20 symptoms associated with PTSD. These symptoms are classified into four categories including: re-experiencing events, hyper-arousal, avoidance, and negative changes in thoughts and feelings. If these symptoms do not resolve on their own over time, an individual may meet criteria for PTSD.

PTSD is an injury like a broken arm. It is a neurobiological adaptation sustained as a result of an overwhelming or stressful event or events, and the chemistry and physiology of the brain are changed. This change need not be permanent, and, like a broken arm, is treatable. PTSD is not a mental weakness, nor is it some self-inflicted emotional problem. No one seems to think that it is a character issue if you have a cavity, a broken arm, or multiple sclerosis.

Individuals affected by mental health issues experience quality of life limitations personally, socially, and occupationally, and have the additional burden bearing the stigma of mental health issues as well. The most serious outcome is that stigma becomes a barrier to seeking treatment and typically forces individuals to pursue other forms of relief such as self-medication via drugs and alcohol or complete avoidance and isolation, which only add another layer to the problem.

May is Mental Health Month. Let’s each do our part to know the science and end the stigma associated with mental health challenges.

To learn more about the Center’s work with military service members, click here. For more information about our post traumatic stress disorder study, in particular, click here.

To learn more about the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation's campaign, “Know Science. No Stigma”, click here.

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BrainHealth Research Shows Strategic Thinking Strengthens Intellectual Capacity | Center for BrainHealth
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BrainHealth

BrainHealth Research Shows Strategic Thinking Strengthens Intellectual Capacity

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, April 28, 2014

Strategy-based cognitive training has the potential to enhance cognitive performance and spill over to real-life benefit according to a data-driven perspective article by the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. The research-based perspective highlights cognitive, neural and real-life changes measured in randomized clinical trials that compared a gist-reasoning strategy-training program to memory training in populations ranging from teenagers to healthy older adults, individuals with brain injury to those at-risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

“Our brains are wired to be inspired,” said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHeath and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair at The University of Texas at Dallas. “One of the key differences in our studies from other interventional research aimed at improving cognitive abilities is that we did not focus on specific cognitive functions such as speed of processing, memory, or learning isolated new skills. Instead, the gist reasoning training program encouraged use of a common set of multi-dimensional thinking strategies to synthesize information and elimination of toxic habits that impair efficient brain performance.”

The training across the studies was short, ranging from 8 to 12 sessions delivered over one to two months in 45 to 60 minute time periods. The protocol focused on three cognitive strategies -- strategic attention, integrated reasoning and innovation. These strategies are hierarchical in nature and can be broadly applied to most complex daily life mental activities.

At a basic level, research participants were encouraged to filter competing information that is irrelevant and focus only on important information. At more advanced levels, participants were instructed to generate interpretations, themes or generalized statements from information they were wanting or needing to read, for example. Each strategy built on previous strategies and research participants were challenged to integrate all steps when tackling mental activities both inside and outside of training.

“Cognitive gains were documented in trained areas such as abstracting, reasoning, and innovating,” said Chapman. “And benefits also spilled over to untrained areas such as memory for facts, planning, and problem solving. What’s exciting about this work is that in randomized trials comparing gist reasoning training to memory training, we found that it was not learning new information that engaged widespread brain networks and elevated cognitive performance, but rather actually deeper processing of information and using that information in new ways that augmented brain performance.

Strengthening intellectual capacity is no longer science fiction; what used to seem improbable is now in the realm of reality.”

Positive physical changes within the brain and cognitive improvement across populations in response to strategy-based mental training demonstrate the neuro-regenerative potential of the brain.

“The ability to recognize, synthesize and create the essence of complex ideas and problems to solve are fundamental skills for academic, occupational and real-life success,” Chapman said. “The capacity to enhance cognition and complex neural networks in health, after injury or disease diagnosis will have major implications to preventing, diagnosing and treating cognitive decline and enhancing cognitive performance in youth to prepare them for an unknown future and in middle age to older adults who want to remain mentally robust.”

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Inaugural Brain Health Summit Focused On Resilience and Regeneration | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Inaugural Brain Health Summit Focused On Resilience and Regeneration

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, April 25, 2014

On April 28, the Center for BrainHealth brought together national experts to discuss solutions to our most pressing brain-related challenges at its inaugural Brain Health Summit, titled "The Human Brain: Resilience and Regeneration."

Summit participants garnered insights to important initiatives designed to improve our nation’s brain health through research, education and implementation programs to improve brain performance. Panel discussions and keynote presentations focused on innovative research advances, awareness efforts and practical application to promote brain health fitness for all ages and stages including students, healthy aging adults, athletes and military service members.

Watch videos of the keynote presentations and panel discussions here.

Speakers and panelists included:

  • U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA), ranking member of the Judiciary Committee and senior member of the Finance and Budget Committees
  • U.S. Representative Chaka Fattah (D-PA), member of the Appropriations Committee
  • Libby Doggett, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Early Learning, U.S. Department of Education
  • General Peter W. Chiarelli, U.S. Army (Ret.), former Vice Chief of Staff and now CEO of One Mind for Research
  • Claudio Sanchez, National Education Correspondent, NPR
  • Dr. Bror Saxberg, Chief Learning Officer, Kaplan Learning and Innovation
  • Dr. John Gabrieli, Director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the McGovern Institute at MIT and Co-director of the MIT Clinical Research Center
  • Bill O'Brien, Senior Advisor for Program Innovation, National Endowment for the Arts
  • Dr. Jacquelyn Gamino, Director of Adolescent Reasoning Initiative, Center for BrainHealth
  • Ambassador James Glassman
  • Dr. Molly V. Wagster, Chief, Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience Branch, Division of Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging
  • Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Founder and Chief Director, Center for BrainHealth
  • Dr. Lee Dockery, McKnight Brain Research Foundation
  • Keith Epstein, Senior Strategic Advisor, AARP
  • Susan Brink, freelance health and medicine reporter
  • Dr. Justin Sanchez, DARPA
  • Morgan Luttrell, U.S. Navy SEAL (Ret.)
  • Daryl Johnston, Former Dallas Cowboy
  • Dr. Lori Cook, Director of Pediatric Brain Injury Programs, Center for BrainHealth

"Pioneering research has shown that the brain is capable of substantive improvement in cognitive capacity and performance across the lifespan,” said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth. “The focus of the summit was to raise awareness of this important fact, to incite new research directions and encourage everyone to take steps to strengthen their brains today.”

The 2014 Summit kicked off the Center for BrainHealth’s new national effort to increase brain health fitness, which also includes the launch of BrainHealthDaily.com.

"We are thrilled to announce the launch of BrainHealthDaily.com which will provide visitors with timely insight into matters of the mind," Chapman said. "The safety, preservation and improvement of the human brain have risen to the top of our national discourse, and we are proud to provide a platform highlighting the very latest on brain health, brain injury and brain disease.”

BrainHealthDaily.com is the gateway to curated, scientifically relevant news and opinion on the brain from around the world. The site houses video from the inaugural Brain Health Summit, including panel discussions and keynote speeches. Watch videos of the keynote presentations and panel discussions here.

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Don’t Accept Underperformance, Teach Kids How to Think | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

Don’t Accept Underperformance, Teach Kids How to Think

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Problem solving is a critical skill, particularly for young children whose brains are rapidly developing. Navigating complex problems and exercising innovation is at the core of brain performance and student readiness.

Fortunately, this is an area where U.S. students are proving strong – though there is still room for improvement when compared to their international peers.

The latest results released by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, show that American scores on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) exams assessing problem-solving skills were above the average of those in the developed world.  While I don’t want to diminish the good news here, the bad news is they trailed several countries in Asia and Europe as well as Canada.  And let’s not forget U.S. scores for the PISA exams in reading, math, and science haven’t improved in a decade.

I say we can do better. The key is teaching how to think, rather than what to think. This idea is central to an approach developed at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas-- one that emphasizes the fourth “R” of education: reasoning. 

Based on our research about adolescent brain development, we have begun implementing a curriculum we call Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training, or SMART, which focuses on enhancing brain processes such as mental flexibility, innovation, problem-solving, reasoning and strategic thinking among middle-school students. SMART is a top-down approach to learning that helps students develop context and meaning from the massive amount of information they take in every day. The idea is to encourage students to glean the big picture first, and then support it with details next. Research shows our brains work better that way, and yet it’s opposite of what’s put in most schools. 

Students in our program are given over one month, 10 sessions by a trained SMART teacher who offers techniques for uncovering deeper meanings and discarding irrelevant information. Instead of asking students to underline key points, the training challenges students to mark out at least 50% or more of the extraneous information so the major ideas rise to the top. We find trying to learn every piece of information presented without being selective overwhelms students’ brains.  Nationally, more than 25,000 students have received SMART training and the benefits have been profound.

Our research shows that the approach helps affluent and poor alike. In fact, we have already seen that SMART can be a catalyst for academic success for students in the Dallas Independent School District, many of whom have grown up in poverty.

Results from a pilot project for eighth graders at Thomas J. Rusk Middle School in Dallas are extremely promising. Rusk’s student body is 82 percent Hispanic and 13 percent African-American, and 91 percent of children received free or reduced-price lunch because of low household income[1] (nationally, 68 percent of students get free or reduced lunch).[2]

Prior to participating in SMART, 95 percent of students did not meet age-based criteria for critical reasoning skills. But after four weeks in the program, SMART participants showed more than a 50 percent improvement in critical reasoning scores, while their peers in the control group did not improve significantly.  Additionally, all of the SMART participants passed the reading portion on TAKS. So did the benefits last? Four years later as seniors, 80% of those students were on track to graduate and 74% of them were in more than three Advanced Placement classes.

Teaching our students to reason enhances their abilities to think strategically, allowing them not only to remember important facts but also to create new ideas. 

Einstein once said: “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

I couldn’t agree more. Innovative thinking is the richest natural resource that we have. Developing critical skill will help with all subjects, and prepare students to thrive in the complex world of adulthood.

Underperformance in academics among American teenagers is a problem we can solve.  Focusing on critical reasoning skills through programs like SMART will improve the ability of all students, regardless socioeconomic status, to succeed at school and in life, and help close the gap with our global neighbors. 



[1]
http://projects.propublica.org/schools/schools/481623001347

[2]http://febp.newamerica.net/background-analysis/federal-school-nutrition-programs

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Researchers Win Grant to Fund Study of Multiple Sclerosis | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Researchers Win Grant to Fund Study of Multiple Sclerosis

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, April 17, 2014

Two Center for BrainHealth researchers have been awarded a grant to study a common complaint among many multiple sclerosis sufferers — difficulty understanding spoken language.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has awarded Dr. John Hart, the Center for BrainHealth’s medical science director and Jane and Bud Smith Distinguished Chair, and Dr. Gail Tillman, research scientist and electroencephalography lab director at the center, more than $690,000 for a three-year study to investigate neural markers related to the frequent problem.

“Understanding language is very complex,” Hart said. “In addition to good hearing, it requires remembering what was said earlier in a conversation and even what was said earlier in each sentence. It requires being able to pay attention and knowing what words mean.

"Because being unable to follow conversations can have such a substantial and negative impact on social and work functioning at many levels, understanding this deficit is vitally important to the quality of life of those diagnosed with MS.”

Multiple sclerosisis a disease of the central nervous system that affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. Although not usually fatal, the disease can be debilitating since it involves the body’s immune system attacking its own central nervous system including the brain, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Almost half of all people diagnosed will develop problems with cognitive functions, such as following conversations.

As part of the study, Hart and Tillman will use electroencephalography (EEG), which measures electrical activity in the brain, to gauge the speed from the point at which the sound of a word enters the ear to when the brain has processed its meaning.

“Compared to other imaging technologies, EEG is much more sensitive to processing speed,” Tillman said. “We can measure how quickly the brain is moving from one process to the next using the millisecond time scale of the EEG. This is critical because MS damages the brain’s white matter, which is vital for the fast and accurate transmission of signals from one part of the brain to another.”

The study will include 50 multiple sclerosis patients who suffer from speech comprehension problems, 50 other multiple sclerosis patients who do not and 50 healthy people. The aim is to identify specific characteristics and associations between patterns of disability and evidence of the disease at key locations along the auditory and language processing streams.

The Center for BrainHealth will work closely with the Clinical Center for Multiple Sclerosis at UT Southwestern and its director, neurologist Elliott M. Frohman.

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Symposium Focuses on Brain Connectivity in Health and Disease | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Symposium Focuses on Brain Connectivity in Health and Disease

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, April 11, 2014

The Center for BrainHealth hosted Reprogramming the Brain to Health, an annual symposium that brings together top neuroscientists and medical investigators to share breakthroughs in brain research, on April 10.

This year’s symposium focused on the topic of “Brain Connectivity in Health and Disease.” Keynote speaker Dr. Floyd Bloom, chairman emeritus of the department of neuropharmacology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., received the Dr. Charles L. Branch BrainHealth Award for his contributions to the understanding of the dopamine system and its role in brain health and brain decline.

The symposium is held in partnership with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute at the University of California, Berkeley.

Since 2010, the Branch Award has honored neuroscientists who have made noteworthy breakthroughs in brain discoveries. Bloom was the first to receive the award since its namesake, Dr. Charles Branch Sr., died last year. Branch was a leading research scholar, neurosurgeon, humanitarian and brain-mapping pioneer.

“Dr. Bloom has been a major force urgently pushing forward the need for biomedical discoveries to be more rapidly transformed into meaningful advances in health care for society today,” said Dr.  Sandra Bond Chapman, BrainHealth’s founder and chief director, and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair. “For that reason, the Center for BrainHealth is closely aligned with his life mission.”

A leading medical expert in neuroscience, neurology and psychiatry, Bloom is a renowned physician-combined neuroscientist and editor of a book written as the consumer’s “bible” for the brain, The Dana Guide to Brain Health. Dr. Michael Gazzaniga, the first Branch Award recipient, will present the award.

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BrainHealth Joins National Consortium to Study Marijuana Addiction | Center for BrainHealth
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BrainHealth

BrainHealth Joins National Consortium to Study Marijuana Addiction

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has awarded a $500,000 grant to fund the Imaging Data in Emerging Adults with Addiction (IDEAA) Consortium — a large marijuana research data collection undertaking.

Center for BrainHealth is partnering with Harvard University, the University of California, San Diego and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to gain a greater scientific understanding of marijuana and its effects.

“As part of the consortium, we will collect and pool brain-imaging data from marijuana users and nonusers, focusing on regions that control rational decisions and emotional responses," said Dr. Francesca Filbey, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and director of cognitive neuroscience research of addictive behaviors at the Center for BrainHealth. "In healthy individuals, these highly interconnected regions maintain a balance. However, in individuals suffering from addiction, emotions and cravings can overturn reasoning and hijack decision-making.”

Filbey’s team will process the consortium's imaging data investigating the brain at rest. The consortium will help answer the larger questions of marijuana addiction: What are the risk factors that leave some more vulnerable to addiction? What are the detrimental effects of marijuana? What factors promote brain healing and addiction recovery?

Each IDEAA consortium partner will collect a uniform set of neuroimaging measures and will share data on a central IDEAA server, where it will be analyzed. The compiled results will culminate in a large dataset of adolescent to emerging adult marijuana users.

“Researchers are often kept from answering some bigger questions due to the limitations of smaller neuroimaging studies,” said Tim McQueeny, a research associate who recently joined Filbey’s team to help support the new initiative. “The consortium reduces many of those restrictions."

Large datasets that are too costly for one research site to accrue will now be available to all four institutions. The combined data represents all regions of the nation, and can therefore be generalizable.

“Perhaps most important, the IDEAA Consortium will give investigators the power to detect large and small differences, which will promote the discovery of new treatments,” McQueeny said.

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BrainHealth Collaborates with Yale: Virtual Triumph, Real World Success | Center for BrainHealth
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BrainHealth

BrainHealth Collaborates with Yale: Virtual Triumph, Real World Success

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, April 4, 2014

“I want to learn how to make a friend” is the first request Tandra Allen, social cognition project coordinator at the Center for BrainHealth, usually hears when talking to adolescents with autism.

The transition into adulthood is rarely smooth, but autism poses communication challenges that can derail typical milestones. Establishing relationships or beginning a career are hard to do when knowing how to interpret and react to others’ emotions and body language does not come easily.

For the first time, the Center for BrainHealth and the Child Study Center at Yale University Yale School of Medicine are collaborating to help young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve economic and social independence. “It is the technology of tomorrow, today,” explains Daniel Yang, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the Child Study Center at Yale University. “Combining BrainHealth’s virtual reality service model with Yale’s fMRI and EEG techniques, we are able to help individuals with autism and, at the same time, track changes in the brain.”

For more than six years, BrainHealth’s virtual reality program has provided realistic and dynamic opportunities to succeed in social situations. Study findings published recently in the Journal of Autism Developmental Disorders reveal that this cutting-edge technology is a promising tool for improving social skills, cognition, and functioning in autism. “Participants’ scores significantly improve in areas of emotional recognition, as well as the ability to understand and respond to what others are thinking, in as little as five weeks,” said Tandra Allen. “They feel that the training improves their conversation skills. It’s very exciting to be taking this initiative nationwide.”

Carl Lutz, the head of BrainHealth’s virtual reality lab, explained why this works.

“Video games are fun, and this is therapy disguised as a high-tech game with state-of-the-art graphics, real-time face tracking and personalized avatars. Participants don’t realize that while they are having fun, their brains are changing to positively affect future real world scenarios.”

Carly McCullar, a recent UT Dallas graduate who was diagnosed several years ago with ASD, went through the Center’s social cognition training during her senior year. The training taught her to handle dynamic situations such as job interviews, a problem with a neighbor, and
even dating.

“This is real life. If you can succeed in the alternate reality, you can do it for real,” Carly explained. This summer she passed her TExES 191 Early Childhood - 6th Grade Generalist Exam and was subsequently hired to teach Pre-K at W.W. Bushman Elementary School in Dallas. “I wouldn’t have been able to interview and do what I’m doing if it weren’t for the training,” she said. Ms. McCullar also reports, “I have now made real friends, long-lasting friends whom I know I will maintain relationships with. I now truly understand what friendship means and value its importance.”

The researchers hope to prove that the social brain in autism can be rewired with training.

Dr. Yang expounded, “I hope through this collaboration we will help build a service model that can generalize to many other regions in the United States.”

To see BrainHealth's founder and chief director's recent blog for The Huffington Post titled "Insight Into Autism: The Latest Brain Research," click here.

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Faculty Chairs Honor Debbie and Jim Francis and The Meadows Foundation | Center for BrainHealth
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BrainHealth

Faculty Chairs Honor Debbie and Jim Francis and The Meadows Foundation

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, March 25, 2014

A crowd of family members, colleagues and benefactors gathered to pay tribute as UT Dallas celebrated 15 of its most accomplished faculty members with a formal Investiture Ceremony and reception March 18.

The ceremony honored both the distinguished faculty members and the far-sighted donors who helped establish the endowed chairs and professorships, President David E. Daniel said.

“Without this partnership — key leaders who help invest in the future of the University and great faculty members who bring that vision to realization — we would not be the kind of University that we are,” Dr. Daniel said.

For their enduring commitment and generous support, the Center for BrainHealth established two named chairs in honor of Debbie and Jim Francis and The Meadows Foundation.  Daniel Krawczyk, Ph.D. and Bart Rypma, Ph.D. hold the Debbie and Jim Francis Chair in BrainHealth and The Meadows Foundation Chair in Behavioral Brain Science, respectively. Both have made significant research contributions to advance the Center for BrainHealth’s mission to understand, protect and heal the brain.

“The Meadows Foundation Chair will provide a tremendous opportunity to deepen our understanding of changes that take place in the aging brain, “ said Dr. Rypma. “It will also aid in revealing the complex underpinnings of multiple sclerosis and new avenues to improved treatment outcomes.”

“Debbie and Jim have been inspiring forces for a long time,” said Dr. Krawczyk. “Holding this chair in their name is really a permanent tribute to their efforts and all of the treatments, interventions and trainings that will result because of it. By creating new knowledge we are improving peoples’ lives and their brain health.”

UT Dallas has more than 100 chairs and professorships, the highest academic awards that the University can bestow on a faculty member. Funding generated by the establishment of a chair or professorship plays a critical role in assisting faculty members to advance their instructional programs and research.

Investitures are one of the oldest traditions in academia, dating back more than 500 years. They originated in England as a way for universities to honor their most accomplished scholars. 

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Are Your Daily Habits Toxic To Your Brain Health? | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Are Your Daily Habits Toxic To Your Brain Health?

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, March 13, 2014

Are your daily habits harmful or helpful to your brain's health? Find out if your daily routine is toxic to your brain's health and learn tips to improve brain's performance by downloading the infographic below that was created in partnership with our friends at The Container Store and made possible by their generosity.
 

Click here to download the infographic.

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Dr. Chapman’s TEDx Talk

Watch and share Dr. Chapman's 10-minute TEDx Talk at TEDxRockCreekPark.

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Your Brain Doesn’t Have to Decline As You Age | Center for BrainHealth
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From the Chief Director

Your Brain Doesn’t Have to Decline As You Age

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Thursday, March 13, 2014

This week is Brain Awareness Week; while most people only focus on their brain after an injury or disease diagnosis, so much can be done to maximize brain performance in health. Just as we've come to realize that we can better our bodies through diet and exercise, so, too, can we improve our own brain's performance.

Hubertus von Hohenlohe, an alpine skier, turned 55 shortly after the Winter Olympics began in Sochi, becoming the oldest competitor at the Games. While he didn’t win a medal, Von Hohenlohe – who is also a businessman, pop singer, and photographer – was a worldwide inspiration as he competed alongside athletes less than half his age. He demonstrated that physical health doesn’t have an age limit. Neither, you might be surprised to learn, does brain health.

Thanks to scientific advances, many people now live to 100 and beyond; there are 12,000 centenarians in England alone, a five-fold increase in 30 years and one in three infants born today is predicted to live to 100 years. Yet few healthy aging adults maintain peak brain performance throughout their lives. In fact, science has shown that cognitive brain performance peaks in our early 40s. With better public health policies, we can improve the brain health of everyone – including the oldest Americans – to better extend our brain span to match our extended lifespan.

Unfortunately,we have grown to expect cognitive decline as an inevitable consequence of aging. Some cognitive skills do slip with age such as speed and quantity of learning capacity. However, a healthy aging brain can continually strengthen drawing on its rich knowledge, experience and wisdom to enhance the decision-making and critical reasoning skills that are essential to independent living. In fact,the majority of seniors aged 85 and older manifest a potential for well-preserved intellect, capacity for new learning, and sound decision making.

Yet, most of us still believe that our best brain years are in the past. Changing this way of thinking is imperative to improving the cognitive health of this nation. In order to do this, we must recognize two major misconceptions about aging in a healthy brain:

First, aging itself is not a disease. Differences exist between healthy brain aging and brain disease in an aging brain. For example, Alzheimer’s is a disease that afflicts the elderly, but it is not, nor are other kinds of dementia, an inevitable consequence of aging. Age alone is not a key predictor of hindered or impaired cognitive abilities later in life.

Second, we are not stuck with the brain that we have today. Consciously maintaining brain health must become an integralpart of managing our overall health and wellness. Responsible lifestyle choices are necessary to promote and enhance brain health throughout life.

The truth is that our brain changes and adapts moment-to-moment depending on how we use it. Thus, it is important to know what habits enhance brain performance and which ones are detrimental to healthy brain performance. Putting healthy thinking strategies into practice and stopping toxic habits will help to add years to cognitive brain performance to more closely match the increased life expectancy.

Brain overuse equals underutilized potential. Just like unrelenting and constant physical exercise causes overexertion and bodily injury, constant mental work is harmful to the brain. Not giving the brain the downtime it needs depletes its overall health, productivity and ability to innovate.

For better brain health it is also important to avoid cruising on automatic pilot. Life moves fast, and we often compensate by falling into routine, sticking to the path of least resistance, and letting our thoughts, conversations and activities become stagnant. Rote memorization and regurgitation of information at the lowest level fails to challenge our brain to do what it loves best: innovate. Allowing your brain to function at this low level fails to strengthen the connections in your brain. Your brain is changing, but in an unwanted negative decline. Instead, start thinking like a reporter, and synthesize ideas in new ways. After enjoying a movie, book or news article think deeply, and formulate succinct take-away messages.

Research shows that higher performing minds are not more efficient at knowing what to pay attention to, but rather, what to block out. Our brain is exposed to an unrelenting stream of information via various sources of technology and media as well as an overabundance of input from family and social responsibilities. This constant state of information-overload degrades the brain’s natural ability to block out irrelevant information, decreasing efficiency and performance. To help boost your brain’s blocker, limit what you take and make it your prerogative to temporarily unplug from technology daily. Start with 15-minute intervals and work your way up. You will find that disconnecting will prime your brain for deeper thinking.

Our brain is at least as modifiable, if not more so, than any other part of our body.  Taking advantage of a unique quality known as neuroplasticity, the brain’s inherent ability to adapt and change throughout life, you can train your brain for health and productivity. You would not go through life sitting on the couch or running a marathon every day and still expect to remain in perfect physical health.  Nor can you expect your brain to remain in prime condition if you leave it on autopilot exempt from new challenges or keep it constantly exhausted with nonstop work.

We should all make a concerted effort to take advantage of the vast opportunities for modifying declining brain performance, keeping in mind that the window for action is not restricted to early life, but extends throughout life – in health, in injury and in disease.

Let’s change the negative framing of brain aging and instead harness the potential of our brain’s capacity across the lifespan. It is not likely that any pill or quick fix alone will make a lasting difference on cognitive performance. And why should we expect that? The human brain may quite possibly be the most complex engine ever designed. Public policy and individual efforts should focus on encouraging strategies to maintain and optimize brain health fitness. In doing so, we will reap the rewards of nurturing our greatest asset and natural resource – the brain – for the rest of our lives.

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Center for BrainHealth Partners with NFL Great to Touch Lives in Dallas School | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Center for BrainHealth Partners with NFL Great to Touch Lives in Dallas School

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, March 7, 2014

The middle school years are when students gain crucial skills necessary for future academic and life success. Today, the Center for BrainHealth announced a partnership with LaDainian & Torsha Tomlinson's Touching Lives Foundation and its flagship initiative called Project XXI to further impact adolescent students, teachers and leadership at Thomas A. Edison Middle Learning Center in West Dallas.

The Center for BrainHealth and Project XXI have created SOAR (Students’ Outstanding Academic Rise) to promote healthy life habits and inspire teachers, students and parents to partner together for continued academic achievement. SOAR will complement the Center for BrainHealth-developed brain training program called SMART (Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training) and is based on responsibility that requires all parties to attain specific conduct, activities, and academic enhancement on a daily basis.

“Our work with faculty and leadership at Edison is ongoing; it is the first middle school where we have infused the entire campus with our brain training program,” said Dr. Jacque Gamino, Director of the Center’s Adolescent Reasoning Initiative. “While we know that our brain training program induces cognitive change which leads to improved academic performance, we want to ensure that the students, teachers and parents at Edison are bolstered by support for healthy lifestyle goals and emboldened to be accountable to themselves and each other in their quest for academic success.”

"Torsha and I have become increasingly aware in the communities we serve that there are subsets of disadvantaged youth who are given up on because society deems they cannot be reached,” said LaDainian Tomlinson. “That is wholly unacceptable to us. Project XXI’s vision ultimately is to help children reach their full potential. Not some of them...all of them. Center for BrainHealth and Project XXI’s SOAR program is designed to address the students, educators and parents who are most responsible for individual success."

SOAR will include accountability measures from the students, teachers, and parents, such as educator-led curriculum enhancements and student demonstration of personal responsibility for learning. The focus of the initiative is to increase academic achievement and instill the resolve to succeed in the more than 600 students that attend Edison. Students, teachers and parents exhibiting the greatest improvement will be rewarded for their participation and accountability with Leadership Awards, memorabilia and even an unforgettable outing with LaDainian and Torsha to be announced at launch.

“To effect change, we must promote self-esteem,” Torsha Tomlinson continued. “We cannot let good enough be good enough, and parents must be a part of the solution. SOAR will provide monitoring and management of specific activities, goals, and incentives for students, teachers and parents and aims to improve academic performance individually.”

Center for BrainHealth researchers trained Edison teachers to implement SMART in their classrooms effectively and are continuing to work with the faculty to reach optimum outcomes. SMART encourages students to use higher-level thinking skills such as asking thoughtful questions and make meaningful connections to real world situations and discourage rote thinking and responses. Since 2006, Center for BrainHealth researchers have trained more than 25,000 students in five states, more than 300 teachers and more than 95 principals and school administrators.

“From our recent professional development training with Edison teachers, our team could not have been more impressed with the courageous commitment of the leadership and teachers on campus to positively impact and mentor the learning confidence of their students,” said Dr. Gamino. “By bringing research-based best practices to the school and encouraging accountability inside and outside of the walls of Edison, we hope to engage students in learning, spark innovation in the classroom, and dramatically affect student outcomes in life.”

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Sleep to Improve Cognitive Performance | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Sleep to Improve Cognitive Performance

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, March 3, 2014

Center for BrainHealth advances the vital role of sleep to improve cognitive performance.

One of this year's renowned speakers for The Brain: An Owner's Guide lecture series made possible by the generosity and vision of The Container Store was Dr. James Maas.

His sold-out Sleeping for Success lecture sponsored by J. Baxter Brinkmann was held on February 11, 2014. Please enjoy this brief video interview in which Dr. Maas shares his expert sleep insights, tips and reasons why getting enough sleep is more important than you might think.

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The Real 1% | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

The Voice of BrainHealth

The Real 1%

By: Eric Bennett, C.F.A., C.P.A.
Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The recent census has our population at roughly 319,000,000, and simple math tells us that 1% of the above number equals 3,190,000. So much attention has been given to the 1% of wealthiest Americans, but I would like to focus on the post 9/11 veterans that, coincidentally, are also about 1% of our population. This 1% is truly worth talking about.

This 1% protects the freedom of the other 99%. Without them, our country is not as safe, and without them, we could not enjoy the liberties we have daily.

You don’t have to agree with the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan or even agree with war at all. But, how can we not be anything but absolutely grateful and honored that so many men and women would fight selflessly to protect our country?

As citizens of this great nation, we have an obligation to do our part. The government trains these brave men and women and supports them to a high degree throughout their active military duty. But, when they leave military service, our veterans need our support.

I have never served in the military. Before I joined the Center for BrainHealth’s Brain Performance Institute, I can honestly say that I did not know many veterans. I certainly did not know them well enough to form an opinion about how they could contribute to the civilian sector.

I can now say with the upmost confidence that because of their military experience, warriors are among some of the finest employees I have ever had. They are team players, dedicated professionals, possess a great work ethic and are adaptable. Military service members are tenacious. In short, they get the job done.

So, what should we do as executives in corporate America, leaders in the non-profit world and influencers in our communities? I know for sure that veterans don’t want us to feel sorry for them. They are not victims that need our pity. They are Americans that want what we all want – opportunity. An opportunity for a career that is fulfilling, challenging and provides for their family. An opportunity to grow and find meaning and purpose in their lives. An opportunity to continue serving others.

I challenge you to the following to help bridge the civilian military divide and prepare some of America’s finest for their next mission as productive and successful citizens.

  • Don’t stigmatize them as being different. Diagnoses such as traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress are not unique to combat and military experience.

  • Look at military service as incredibly valuable experience. With their unique perspective, veterans can enrich the fabric of our communities, our working environments, our friendships and this nation.

  • Welcome these post 9/11 veterans into your workplace -- whether you are a business owner, in the human resources department, or a colleague. Their military training and experience should be as meaningful as an advanced degree.

  • Give time and/or money to veteran service organizations that are worthy. There are more than 40,000 non-profits who in some way provide support to military service members. These organizations are providing support and services the government does not.

We often fear what we don’t understand, and we can’t possibly understand what its like to serve in the military if we have not done it. Hopefully, we can agree that supporting this 1% is a much more important conversation.

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Empowering Our Nation’s Warriors | Center for BrainHealth
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From the Chief Director

Empowering Our Nation’s Warriors

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Thursday, February 20, 2014

At Bush Institute's Empowering Our Nation's Warriors Summit yesterday, President George W. Bush highlighted the Center for BrainHealth as a "pioneering program" to address traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other invisible wounds of war.

In his remarks, President Bush charged the American public, military, non-profit, community and corporate leaders to help end the false stigma surrounding post-traumatic stress (PTS) and provide veterans with innovative programs that address PTS and TBI.

The Center for BrainHealth and Brain Performance Institute are working to help bridge the military and civilian divide and break down barriers that prevent our brave military service men and women from achieving the American dreams that they have so valiantly defended.

To see and read President Bush's speech about empowering our nation's warriors, click here.

To learn more about our warrior intitiatives, click here.

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The Simmons Family Foundation: Igniting Innovative Education | Center for BrainHealth
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BrainHealth

The Simmons Family Foundation: Igniting Innovative Education

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, February 7, 2014

The Simmons Family Foundation is betting on the power of brain science to revolutionize one of our nation’s most pressing concerns – education of our youth. They have invested $2.5 million to implement programs, developed at the Center for BrainHealth, across Texas to create a model for national education reform.

Worldwide, the United States has fallen from number one in high school graduation to number 22 out of 27 ranked countries, according to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). Domestic advances are failing to compete with other developed countries that have worked aggressively at education reform. Curricula in top performing countries have evolved to emphasize creative thinking, problem solving and the ability to innovate, an OECD report points out.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan emphasizes, “I think in other countries, there’s a greater understanding that education is the path to a middle-class life. And somehow we have to get back that sense of urgency, that commitment that other countries have.”

The Simmons Family Foundation gift to the Center for BrainHealth’s Brain Performance Institute aims to help bring the U.S. back to its former global esteem. Priming teens for high school success, the generous donation will be used to integrate scientifically-proven high performance brain training, known as SMART, into several public middle schools of low socioeconomic status across Texas beginning in fall 2014. Moreover, it will provide extra support to students affected by two issues also in the national spotlight: the growing number of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and the 20% increase in bullying in the last 10 years.

“The Simmons Family Foundation is dedicated to affecting change on important issues,” explains Lisa Simmons, trustee of The Simmons Family Foundation. “Transforming our education system is at the top of the list, and we believe the SMART training is vital to teach middle school students to learn and think strategically.  With the number of young people facing social challenges, such as bullying, on the rise, the opportunity to promote social and emotional well being really appealed to us.“

The two programs will be delivered on a wide scale and are based on decades of research. Both inspire creative, insightful and resourceful thinking and are proven to strengthen the part of the brain responsible for critical thinking, reasoning, decision-making and problem solving – key aspects necessary to compete on an international level.

“With the campus-wide approach, SMART will be infused into the school’s culture and curriculum,” says Jacque Gamino, Ph.D., Director of the Center for BrainHealth’s Adolescent Reasoning Initiative. “When students are inspired to be involved in the learning process, innovation and creativity lead to engagement and academic success. Involving entire faculties and parents in the SMART program helps bolster student achievement.”

The social cognition program targeting those involved in bullying, individuals with an ASD diagnosis and other teens who face significant social challenges will be made available to students based on teacher recommendation. The cutting-edge virtual reality program, complete with personalized avatars and face tracking software, is a safe learning environment disguised as a fun video game that allows participants to triumph at real-life situations such as peer pressure, disagreements and building friendships.

Dr. Gamino and Sandra Chapman, Ph.D., the Center’s Founder and Chief Director, recently visited with officials in Secretary Duncan’s office to discuss scalability and future prospects for SMART on the national level. “We are grateful to The Simmons Family Foundation for the opportunity to expand these proven programs,” says Dr. Chapman. “Expanding SMART on this scale not only improves the minds of more students, but also continues to validate our research and the program’s potential to have a monumental impact on the U.S. education system.”

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Playing Football: What Every Parent and Coach Should Know | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Playing Football: What Every Parent and Coach Should Know

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, January 14, 2014

BrainHealth’s Dr. Sandra Chapman weighed in on the discussion about sports-related concussions yesterday at the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA)’s annual convention, saying the benefits of youth football “far exceed the risk of permanent brain damage.” 

In a speech delivered to hundreds of football coaches, Dr. Chapman said it is a myth that a single concussion always causes permanent cognitive impairment. She explained that, in most cases, an individual will fully recover after a concussion given proper management, therapy and time to heal.

BrainFacts.org, a public information initiative of the Society for Neuroscience, addresses the issue of permanent brain damage from concussions on its website saying:

“A concussion, a typically mild and common type of brain injury, usually results in only temporary disruption of brain functions as long as there is adequate recovery time and no repeated injury. Even after more serious brain injury…research indicates that – especially with the help of therapy – the brain may be capable of developing new connections and “reroute” function through healthy areas.”

Dr. Chapman, who has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for 25 years to study the long-term effects of concussion in pediatric patients through age 25, acknowledged that the most important aspect is concussion prevention and continuing to make football safer. The interdisciplinary team she works with includes cognitive neuroscientits, rehabilitation specialists, speech-language pathologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, brain imaging experts and neurosurgeons. She also emphasized that monitoring cognitive and emotional symptoms is key to addressing any later-emerging deficits and that having a clear process for handling concussions increases the likelihood of recovery and improvement. Dr. Chapman said that once an athlete has experienced a concussion, it needs to be treated like a chronic condition and monitored annually to make sure the symptoms remain in remission.

During her presentation, Dr. Chapman explained that playing football and other sports provide rich and proven opportunities to:

  • Inspire youth to embrace and optimize their emerging potential
  • Prevent and mitigate risks of lifelong addictions to nicotine, alcohol and drugs
  • Ward off depression by increasing dopamine through thrills of camaraderie and jointly shared purpose
  • Expose young people to healthy role models, such as coaches and mentors outside the family circle
  • Strengthen a committed connection to schoolwork and activities
  • Reduce addiction to gaming technology
  • Provide regular exercise to stay physically and mentally fit while elevating mood
  • Strengthen cooperation, social cognition and friendship skills
  • Build leadership skills through actions and empathy
  • Maintain better sleep habits at a time of life when the sleep cycle is disturbed and more sleep is required

She also shared some guidelines for treating concussions; additional resources are listed on the CDC website here.

A. Treat brain injuries with the same care you would treat other serious injuries. A player who breaks an ankle would not be sent out to play the next day.

B. After an injury, have the player immediately see a qualified medical professional—preferably a neurologist with experience in concussions—for diagnosis and treatment.

C. Remove the player from play until symptoms have disappeared.

D. Restrict the player from strenuous activity and weightlifting.

E. Remove the player from complex mental activity, such as school work and tests, for 1 to 3 weeks, with gradual return depending on the individual’s rate of recovery.

F. Restrict use of screens—computer, phone, video games and texting—for approximately 3 weeks; these can delay the brain’s healing process.

G. Keep the player from driving while symptomatic.

H. Limit the player’s intake of caffeinated drinks.

I. As symptoms improve, make incremental academic adjustments with a gradual “return to learn.”

So instead of swearing off sports, which provide benefits such as warding off depression, mitigating risks of lifelong addictions and promoting better sleep habits, Dr. Chapman suggests all of us – athletes or not -- focus on training our brains to build life-long cognitive resilience. 

For additional information about Dr. Chapman and the Center for BrainHealth’s work with concussions and other traumatic brain injuries, click here.

Dr, Chapman has no conflict of interests.

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Push-ups and Sit-ups for the Mind | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Push-ups and Sit-ups for the Mind

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, January 10, 2014

 

Major General Lee Baxter, USA (Retired) served in the United States Army for 31 years; his military career revolved principally around command assignments in Europe and the United States. General Baxter also served in Israel, Egypt, and the Sinai desert as a United Nation's peacekeeper. His career culminated with command of the Army Personnel Center, where his responsibilities included implementation of U.S. Army Human Resources policy worldwide, and then as Commanding General of the United States Army Field Artillery Center and School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He is a Senior Advisor for Warrior Initiatives at the Brain Performance Institute.

Physical fitness is as old as the military and has progressed over time as new and superior methods have been developed, honed and deployed to the masses. Physical readiness for our soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines focuses on keeping their bodies prepared to endure the rigors of extreme conditions in combat. In recent years, and for the first time in over 20 years, the Army has considered substantive changes in how we assess our soldiers physically. No more two-mile runs against a time standard, no more simple sit-ups and push-ups; but now physical fitness requirements which attempt to replicate the needs of the body while in combat. This includes an Army Combat Readiness Test, and such regimens as carrying heavy ammunition, walking on balance beams, and simulating the dragging of casualties over rough terrain to safety.  These changes and this progress are intended to reflect the true physical readiness of an individual, not just a snapshot of how he or she has been able to “peak” for the PT Test.

However, less progress has been shown in terms of deployment of programs developed to assess and increase the mental, emotional and psychological readiness of our troops. We now know the seriousness of the impact the repeated and multiple deployments to combat theaters have caused in our post-9-11 veterans. Estimates suggest more than 30% are experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and nearly a quarter million of those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan have moderate or severe traumatic brain injury. Suicide rates among returning veterans are climbing, and experts indicate that an unprecedented number are ending their lives every day.

Dealing with these mental phenomena are critical to the long-term health and combat readiness of our forces, both active duty and retired. It’s about brain health and the non-profit, research-focused Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas in Dallas is doing something about it.

In my 32 years in the Army, spanning the decades of Vietnam to Desert Shield and Desert Storm, I can't recall an initiative more in tune with what our veterans need so badly. The newly established Brain Performance Institute, the delivery arm of the Center for BrainHealth, is now supporting veterans of all services with free (funded by private donation) high performance brain training that has been proven to be remarkably effective not only for those suffering physical head trauma but also those diagnosed with PTSD. The program, called Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training (SMART), provides the tools and strategies needed to improve brain health; it’s essentially push-ups and sit-ups for the mind to stay in prime shape.

It is my belief that thorough the Brain Performance Institute, the potential exists to not only provide cutting edge treatment and research-based therapies and training to thousands of veterans across the United States, but to indeed establish Dallas as the Center of Excellence in the country for such programs.

Licensed clinicians, supported by warriors with military backgrounds who have completed the training and reached new life goals, conduct the training program. It is available now in Dallas or via Mobile Training Teams who are reaching out to veterans from Maine to Washington, and all states in between.

The military has turned some cultural corners, and the negative, macho stigma associated with seeking assistance, such as marital counseling, has somewhat dissipated; the acknowledgement of vulnerabilities is more widely accepted and has encouraged other service members to seek support and help with their own difficulties.

However, the challenges facing our veterans returning from multiple deployments are well documented and more challenging in scope and scale than ever before. Homelessness, joblessness, education, families, and the particular issues of military women are daunting, need resourcing, and prioritization on a national scale. Principal among these, though, is wellness; physical and mental wellness.  And the Center for BrainHealth and the Brain Performance Institute are at the cutting-edge...bringing our veterans back from an abyss to become, once again, national assets, but this time off the battlefield.

Major General Lee Baxter will be participating in the high-performance brain-training program known as SMART next month and will be chronicling his experience online. For additional information about the programs available for military service members at the Center for BrainHealth and Brain Performance Institute, click here.

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Study Finds Aerobic Exercise Improves Memory, Brain Function and Physical Fitness | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Study Finds Aerobic Exercise Improves Memory, Brain Function and Physical Fitness

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online in the open-access journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience found that engaging in a physical exercise regimen helps healthy aging adults improve their memory, brain health and physical fitness. This finding is significant considering that among adults 50 and older, “staying mentally sharp” outranks social security and physical health as the top priority and concern in the United States.

“Science has shown that aging decreases mental efficiency and memory decline is the number one cognitive complaint of older adults,” said Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D., founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and lead author of the paper. “This research shows the tremendous benefit of aerobic exercise on a person’s memory and demonstrates that aerobic exercise can reduce both the biological and cognitive consequences of aging.”

For the study, sedentary adults ages 57-75 were randomized into a physical training or a wait-list control group. The physical training group participated in supervised aerobic exercise on a stationary bike or treadmill for one hour, three times a week for 12 weeks. Participants’ cognition, resting cerebral blood flow, and cardiovascular fitness were assessed at three time points: before beginning the physical exercise regimen, mid-way through at 6 weeks, and post-training at 12 weeks.

“By measuring brain blood flow non-invasively using arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, we can now begin to detect brain changes much earlier than before,” said Sina Aslan, Ph.D., founder and president of Advance MRI and collaborator on the study. “One key region where we saw increase in brain blood flow was the anterior cingulate, indicating higher neuronal activity and metabolic rate. The anterior cingulate has been linked to superior cognition in late life.”

Exercisers who improved their memory performance also showed greater increase in brain blood flow to the hippocampus, the key brain region affected by Alzheimer’s disease. Chapman pointed out that, using noninvasive brain imaging techniques, brain changes were identified earlier than memory improvements, implicating brain blood flow as a promising and sensitive metric of brain health gains across treatment regimens.

“Physical exercise may be one of the most beneficial and cost-effective therapies widely available to everyone to elevate memory performance,” Chapman said. “These findings should motivate adults of all ages to start exercising aerobically.”

Chapman cautioned that while physical exercise is associated with a selective or regional brain blood flow, it did not produce a change in global brain blood flow.

“In another recent study, we have shown that complex mental training increases whole brain blood flow as well as regional brain blood flow across key brain networks,” Chapman said. “The combination of physical and mental exercise may be the best health measures to improve overall cognitive brain health. We have just begun to test the upper boundaries of how we can enhance our brain’s performance into late life. To think we can alter and improve the basic structure of the mature brain through aerobic exercise and complex thinking should inspire us to challenge our thinking and get moving at any age.”

The research was funded by the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (RC1-AG035954), the Lyda Hill Foundation, the T. Boone Pickens Foundation, and the Dee Wyly Distinguished University Endowment.
 

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An Open Letter to Warriors | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

An Open Letter to Warriors

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, November 11, 2013

Jake Schick, a former Marine who was severely wounded conducting combat operations in the Sunni Triangle of Iraq in 2004, writes an open letter to his fellow warriors addressing the invisible wounds of war.

Fellow Warriors,

In 2004, the Humvee I was driving hit a triple stack tank mine that was pressure plate ignited. It detonated directly beneath me, throwing me 30 feet into the air, and I landed on my head. Needless to say, it was a long day at the office. 

I was in the hospital for a year and a half. I’ve undergone 46 operations and 23 blood transfusions and endured countless hours of rehabilitation. I lost parts of my hand, arm and leg, but those weren’t the “worst” of my injuries.

I was labeled with two of the diagnoses we dread: PTSD and TBI.  As we say in the Marines, “Small price to pay to be one of the world’s finest!” And those labels haunted my every day for years. As I like to say, they are the gift that keeps on giving.

It's no secret that transition from service to civilian life is challenging to say the least. We’re each longing for that same sense of purpose and guiding mission; we’re searching for the ultimate sense of community we developed as brothers in arms.

But, there are three things we’re facing that we must overcome. We owe it to each other. 

Twenty-two of our fellow warriors commit suicide everyday because they are simply sick and tired of battling to survive just one more day as a civilian. I must confess the same demon has reared its ugly head in my own life multiple times. Because of who we are and what we have accomplished, I know none of us want to be a statistic. One, much less 22 a day, is too many.

Our warrior brothers are who we listen to. We can change the culture among us to not be fearful or ashamed of what’s going on inside our heads and instead encourage each other to seek appropriate help and proper training. Why? Because we can do something about it.

You can change your brain; you’re not stuck with what you’ve got. Trust me, I’ve done it because another fellow warrior encouraged me. And because of that opportunity, I’ve become a better husband to my wife and a better father to my son. Ultimately, I’ve become a better man.

We’ve each trained for countless hours on how to do things some of us never thought possible or even in the realm of reality. We pushed ourselves physically and mentally further than we ever imagined. We must take that same drive and determination and channel it toward our brain’s health.

I spent several years in the Marine Corps training how to perfect various weapons and weapons systems to be the most effective warrior I could possibly be. But, what more powerful weapon do we have than our very own brain? The Center for BrainHealth’s programs empowered me; now I am able to give back to my fellow warriors through its new Brain Performance Institute.

I challenge you to stop thinking in terms of what is and start thinking what could be.

Semper Fidelis,

Cpl. Jake Schick USMC (RET)

Click here for more information about the Center for BrainHealth’s veteran programs or click here for information about the Center's new Brain Performance Institute.

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From Deployment to Employment: Bridging the Gap from the Battlefield to the Boardroom | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

From Deployment to Employment: Bridging the Gap from the Battlefield to the Boardroom

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, October 30, 2013

There are 1.6 million veterans in Texas, making it one of only three states with a veteran population greater than 1 million. The DFW area ranks as one of the nation’s top places for veterans to live, but yet the national September 2013 unemployment rate of male veterans age 18-24 reached nearly 30%.

It begs the question: how can we bridge the gap from deployment to employment?

On November 12, Admiral Patrick Walsh, former commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and Blue Angel pilot, will address the barriers and bridges warriors face transitioning from service to civilian life during a public lecture presented by the new Brain Performance Institute at the Center for BrainHealth. He will share why warriors are the nation's best and brightest to help businesses and corporations flourish and what the private sector can do take advantage the qualities service members embody.

“One of the most pressing needs of military veterans is gainful, steady employment,” said Eric Bennett, Executive Director of the Brain Performance Institute. “How we treat and reintegrate our nation’s greatest national assets both in and out of uniform will directly affect the success of companies and communities across the nation. By capitalizing on the valuable leadership, decision-making, strategic thinking and problem-solving skills learned in the military, the Brain Performance Institute is dedicated to raising awareness of the challenges warriors face and helping them reach their brain potential and civilian life success.”

In advance of the lecture, Admiral Walsh answered a few questions about the barriers and bridges warriors encounter when transitioning from service to civilian life.

Why is this topic of such importance to you?

It is our social and moral imperative to ease the transition of our all-volunteer force back to the civilian world. These men and women are the 1% of the population who has raised their hand to defend the constitution and our country no matter the sacrifice. It is our responsibility to make sure these soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines are given every opportunity to achieve successful, enriching and fulfilling lives in the civilian workforce.

What qualities do our veterans encompass that make them an asset to the business world?

I would be first in line to hire a veteran. They are dedicated leaders. Veterans are self-disciplined, resilient and willing to work toward the greater good. The stamina veterans must maintain to be successful in a military environment is an asset in the civilian world. They are accustomed to maintaining and sustaining high-level performance in no-fail environments, which translates to an ability to learn, adapt and thrive in the most difficult circumstances.

What would you tell a potential employer about how to leverage warrior capabilities for success in the private sector?

You don’t want to compete against a veteran; you want them on your team. They are proven professionals who understand how to operate and execute a mission; they subscribe to a set of ethics and fully understand principal decision-making. While their resume may not be traditional by business world standards, their qualifications make hiring a veteran a worthwhile investment for any company.

What do you see as the biggest barrier to the warrior transition from military to civilian life?

In previous generations, there were leaders of companies who could look at veteran applicants and direct where those people would best fit within the corporation. Today, because there are so few employers who have hands on experience in the military world, the operating principal is that the service member themselves must find a way to translate their experience and fit within the corporate culture. This mode of operation is a detriment to not only the company but to the veterans themselves.

What is your message to warriors who are in the transition right now?

Come to Texas. Don’t hesitate. Don’t think twice. We need you here and will put you to work.  

To purchase tickets to the Brain Performance Institute lecture at the Center for BrainHealth featuring Admiral Patrick Walsh, click here. The lecture is sponsored by Dennis Berman, Jana and Bob Dransfield, Linda and Joel Robuck, Nancy and Bob Wilber and the Texas Irish Foundation.

Click here for tickets.

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Friends of BrainHealth Raises More Than $1 Million To Futher Innovative Scientific Study | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Friends of BrainHealth Raises More Than $1 Million To Futher Innovative Scientific Study

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, October 25, 2013

The Friends of BrainHealth, a circle of donors whose significant financial contributions directly impact scientific study at the Center for BrainHealth, has raised $1.1 million to advance brain research since the program began four years ago.

“The Friends of BrainHealth was established to empower members of the community to participate, stay up-to-date and significantly shape the scientific study happening at the Center for BrainHealth,” said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, the Center’s founder and chief director and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair. “With the funds raised through the program, we are able to give young scientists an invaluable opportunity to design and lead their own research studies under the tutelage of UT Dallas faculty.”

Graduate students, doctoral candidates and postdoctoral fellows at the Center for BrainHealth compete for $25,000 research grants that are awarded at the annual Friends of BrainHealth Toni Brinker Scientist Selection Luncheon.

2012-2013 Friends of BrainHealth co-chairs Caroline Gehan and Ross and Anne Helbing doubled Friends membership during their tenure, raising more than $360,000. The unprecedented fundraising year supported four awards to exceptional neuroscientists who will be able to make their mark on the field of brain science at an early point in their careers. Their work will contribute to the foundation of future medical breakthroughs and advance the Center for BrainHealth’s mission to understand, protect and heal the brain.

Linda and Joel Robuck joined Friends of BrainHealth at the Visionary Friend Level for the second year in a row and chose to further a study that investigates the neural mechanisms of depression developed by doctoral candidate Nick Hubbard.

“Joel and I see the firm commitment of the Center for BrainHealth’s young scientists to achieve research results,” said Linda Robuck. “We are inspired by the potential to solve real world brain health problems and enhance brain performance.”

Under the guidance of faculty member Dr. Bart Rypma, Nick will use innovative brain imaging to document and understand brain changes that occur as an individual recovers from depression and enters remission. Knowledge gained will inform new treatments aimed at improving the quality of life for millions suffering from the disorder.

The Sapphire Foundation awarded a $25,000 grant to Dr. Nyaz Didehbani, whose research will focus on developing brain biomarkers to improve concussion assessment accuracy. Her work, under the direction of the Center’s medical science director, Dr. John Hart, Jr., will expand current understanding of concussion recovery and help to optimize treatment regimens to ensure a safe return-to-play.

“Sapphire is honored to be able to support such an expert team in a study of great significance,” said Kate and Dana Juett. “Understanding of sports-related concussions and their short and long-term effects is not only topical, but of vital importance.”

Friends of BrainHealth members listened to research proposal presentations from four finalists at the annual luncheon and voted to award the final two grants.

Alison Perez, a doctoral candidate working under the Center’s chief director, Dr. Sandi Chapman, was awarded the Friends of BrainHealth Distinguished New Scientist Award to examine decision-making abilities in adults at risk for developing Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), often the precursor to Alzheimer’s disease. Her research seeks to identify harmful decision-making behavior through cognitive testing and brain imaging in order to develop interventions that extend healthy decision-making ability and autonomy in older adults.

Dr. Asha Vas, a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Chapman’s lab, was awarded $25,000 to test the efficacy of an online high performance brain training program developed by Center researchers to improve higher-level thinking skills in military veterans who have suffered a traumatic brain injury. Her research will adapt the existing training that is currently conducted in-person into a real-time online delivery method that enables veterans across the country access to the scientifically proven program.

Dr. Chapman's incredible leadership at the Center for BrainHealth creates an environment where brilliant minds can explore the complexities of the brain,” said Toni Brinker, who has sponsored the luncheon for the past two years. “Thanks to the generosity of the Friends of BrainHealth, young neuroscientists change lives through innovative scientific study.”

The 2013 Friends of BrainHealth Toni Brinker Scientist Selection Luncheon was co-chaired by Brian and Betty Schultz. Distinguished Friends for 2013 are: Mr. and Mrs. Chuck and Ann Eisemann, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph and Susan Hawkins, Ms. Lyda Hill, Mr. Al Hill, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Kenny and Lisa Troutt. Former honorary chairs of the Friends of BrainHealth include Toni and Norm Brinker, Sue Justice, Sammye Myers and Dee Wyly. Former Friends of BrainHealth chairs include Kimber Hartmann, Angie Kadesky and Daffan Nettle.

The Friends of BrainHealth kicks off their 2013-2014 campaign November 1. Incoming co-chairs are Ballard and Tracy Castleman. Friends of BrainHealth offers six membership levels: Companion ($500), Friend ($1,000), Special Friend ($2,500), Esteemed Friend ($5,000), Distinguished Friend ($10,000), and Visionary Friend ($25,000). To join, visit www.centerforbrainhealth.org/friends.

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Veterans with Gulf War Illness Show Brain Changes Linked to Memory Deficits | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Veterans with Gulf War Illness Show Brain Changes Linked to Memory Deficits

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

New research illuminates definitive brain alterations in troops with Gulf War Illness (GWI) thought to result from the exposure to neurotoxic chemicals, including sarin gas, during the first Persian Gulf War.

“More than 250,000 troops, or approximately 25% of those deployed during the first Persian Gulf War, have been diagnosed with Gulf War Illness (GWI). Although medical professionals have recognized the chronic and often disabling illness for almost two decades, brain changes that uniquely identify GWI have been elusive until now,” explained principal investigator Bart Rypma of the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas.

This study, published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, is novel in that it confirms GWI deficits in working memory, a critical cognitive function that enables short-term retention of information for higher-level thinking ability. In addition, brain alterations revealed in the study show a consistent pattern representing a neurobiological marker that could potentially be used to positively identify GWI.

The research team assessed three aspects of working memory: accuracy, speed, and efficiency. Results showed that participants with GWI performed significantly slower and less accurately than matched healthy veterans, and their efficiency decreased with increasing task difficulty. During these difficult conditions, the participants showed relatively lower levels of activity in prefrontal brain regions which may compromise their ability to implement effective, higher-level thinking strategies in cognitively demanding situations.

“Our results revealed that at the root of cognitive issues in GWI patients are profound working memory deficits that correlate with a unique brain change visible in the fMRI scanner. These results support an empirical link between exposure to neurotoxic chemicals, specifically sarin nerve gas, with cognitive deficits and neurobiological changes in the brain,” said Rypma. “Implementing interventions that improve working memory could have positive effects on many aspects of daily life from the ability to complete a shopping list, match names with faces, all the way to elevating mood.”

“Difficulty remembering has been the most common, unexplained impairment resulting from service in the 1991 Persian Gulf War,” said Robert Haley, co-investigator and Chief of Epidemiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “This functional MRI study provides the first objective evidence showing the exact malfunctions in the brain’s memory circuits that underlie these chemically induced memory problems.” 

The new findings may also have implications for the treatment of several disorders involving similar neural systems, including one Alzheimer’s disease.

“Both GWI and Alzheimer’s disease result in profound cognitive impairment and share similar neurochemical underpinnings,” explained the study’s lead author Nicholas Hubbard. “The distinct neural markers associated with cognitive performance and GWI revealed in our study can be useful for future research to objectively measure the efficacy of treatments for GWI as well as other brain disorders related to the same neurotransmitter system, like Alzheimer’s disease.”

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The Brain Science of Why Teaching To The Test Stalls Cognitive Development | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

The Brain Science of Why Teaching To The Test Stalls Cognitive Development

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Monday, October 14, 2013

The New York Times recently published a letter to the editor from a veteran teacher which sparked a debate about the influential role of standardized testing. 

My experience as director of a brain research institute indicates that Peter Schmidt, the author of the letter, is absolutely right when he says that “students’ independent thinking…and, ultimately, intellectual and moral development” are stunted by the current obsession with testing based on how much you can memorize. Testing is only one manifestation of an emphasis on mechanistic learning that has squelched curiosity and imagination and kept American students behind their peers in most developed countries.

The problem is that rote learning fails to address the fourth “r” in education: reasoning. Research shows that, no matter how old we are, we boost our cognitive development (that is, our brains become beneficially rewired) when we’re engaged in creative and higher-order thinking instead of in efforts to dig up facts from memory. We should be training students how to think – especially by trying to identify and construct unique, big ideas from complex information – rather than what to think. 

When teenagers move away from robotic regurgitation of factoids, they get a big payoff in improved grades, more advanced reasoning skills, and, yes, higher test scores. Jacqueline Gamino, a neuroscientist who heads our Adolescent Reasoning Initiative, finds that the gains accrue across the socioeconomic spectrum, from young people mired in poverty to gifted students bored in classrooms focused on facts.

Teaching students how to become innovative thinkers produces longer-lasting and more intrinsically valuable results than teaching them what to know. Generalized strategic thinking spills over to real-life applications beyond the classroom and empowers students to take responsibility for their own learning and become more creative and adaptive.

Einstein once said: “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces…all there ever will be to know and understand.”

Our brains couldn’t agree more.

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Center for BrainHealth Honors Jane and Henry J. (Bud) Smith with Legacy Award | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Center for BrainHealth Honors Jane and Henry J. (Bud) Smith with Legacy Award

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, October 11, 2013

The Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas presented Jane and Henry J. (Bud) Smith with its highest honor, the Legacy Award, on October 9, 2013 at The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. The BrainHealth Legacy Award recognizes the pioneering spirit of individuals whose vision and dedication to brain research enable the Center to explore the vast potential of the human mind.

“My goal in creating the Center for BrainHealth was to make a difference in people’s lives through innovative research,” said Dr. Sandra B. Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair. “Jane and Bud Smith were instrumental in laying the foundation for our future to truly make an impact not only in Dallas, but across the country and around the world. With their leadership, we are on our way to making world brain health a reality.”

The Smiths graciously gifted the funds necessary to endow a chair for the Center’s medical science director, Dr. John Hart, Jr., and have become actively involved in the Center’s Leadership Council.

“We put much focus on our physical health, which is necessary, but to reach our potential and the next level of performance, we must turn our attention to our brains,” said Jane Smith.  “The Center for BrainHealth has developed and scientifically proven training and treatment programs to make our brains work smarter and more efficiently; programs that open the door to a new world of opportunity for those diagnosed with brain injury or brain disease.”

“The Center for BrainHealth is helping children who are struggling in school, veterans adjusting to civilian life, people who have had concussions or other brain injuries and those of us who are simply aging,” said Bud Smith. “Supporting the Center is one of the best investments that we have made; every one of us can benefit from strengthening our brains.”

Rita and Henry Hortenstine chaired the Legacy Dinner. The host committee included Nancy and Randy Best, Toni Brinker, Ed Cox, Nancy Dedman, Ginny and John Eulich, Gail and Wallace Hall, Susan and Boots Nowlin, Mary Watson and Wallace Stone.

“Henry and I were very honored to be able to recognize Jane and Bud Smith in such a special way, two great visionaries who invested in the Center for BrainHealth when it was in its infancy,” said Rita Hortenstine. “Dr. Chapman demonstrated great courage when she pushed the envelop on brain health research nearly a decade ago and now the world is trying to catch up.”

Past BrainHealth Legacy Award recipients include Dianne Cash, Debbie Francis, T. Boone Pickens, James Huffines, Dee Wyly, Daryl Johnston and Lee Roy Jordan.

Major donors at the Center for BrainHealth Legacy Award Dinner included:

$50,000

Mrs. Charles J. Wyly, Jr./Mr. Charles J. Wyly III

$25,000

Patty and James Huffines/PlainsCapital Bank

$15,000

Ruth and Ken Altshuler

$10,000

Emy Lou and Jerry Baldridge

Nancy and Randy Best

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Can Creativity Be Taught? | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

Can Creativity Be Taught?

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Wednesday, October 2, 2013

When you think of the word creative, what comes to mind? Colored paper, paste and glitter strewn about a kindergarten classroom? High school students sketching still life with pastels? A bawdy theater troupe? Slick ad execs? All too often we relegate the term creative to the context of early childhood development or the arts –in profession or hobby. We define creativity as a gift possessed by a privileged few who are genetically predisposed to some innate trait, instead of as a resource to be cultivated or honed.

In truth, our brains were wired to be inspired; creative capacity and innovative ingenious work synergistically to energize the brain. Research shows that being innovative and creative builds new brain synapses. Creativity cannot only be taught, but because our brain changes daily by how we use it, it can be trained.

Our creative epicenter lies within the complex connections of our brain’s frontal lobe networks.  Brain plasticity studies offer high promise that creative capacity can be positively altered by exercising innovative thinking. Whatsmore, science shows that inspiring innovation enhances our cognitive performance, and the process of learning and creating something new changes brain structure in positive ways.

There is only one caveat to enhancing creativity: we have to put in the effort.

Sure, not all of us are going to discover the theory of relativity, but innovation, creativity and imagination require practice, just like your body must be trained before performing physical feats. All to often, however, we let our brain go on automatic pilot and fail to nourish our curious nature. Rote, rigid, and routine are toxic to creativity and innovation. Exercise your innovative potential and train your brain to be creative with these exercises:

  1. Think of three situations in your personal and professional life that need change now. How will you affect that change? There are infinite possibilities; Our brains are inspired when we see as many diverse ways to do old things.
  2. Rethink a project, presentation, or event that you think went well. Brainstorm at least five ways it could have gone even better and how it could be improved if you had another opportunity tomorrow.
  3. Explore what you are passionate about. Stepping into the unknown does not have to mean abandoning what you know and love. Simply challenging yourself to broaden and deepen knowledge or a skill will ensure that you and your brain are constantly changing, growing and expanding.

Do not let your creativity go dormant from not being properly exercised, and move beyond thinking of creativity as a trait exclusive to children or artists. Instead, embrace your capacity to think creatively, innovatively every single day.

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Is Your Brain Lying to You? | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

Is Your Brain Lying to You?

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Yoga instructor, Trina Hall, gained 40 pounds to prove that her body image was not tied to her self-worth, but instead discovered unexpected feelings of self doubt. Others’ judgments weighed more heavily than she expected on her self-confidence. In a follow-up comment to her now viral blog post she said, “This story was meant to engage myself and others in a bigger conversation about what we value. I do value health and I value conversations that encourage people to look at the way they think.”

I immediately thought, “What about brain image?” No, not brain image as in MRI or CT Scan, but how we feel about our brain – and even more specifically about our brain’s performance. What is our value as a thinking human being? How does how smart or how stupid we feel influence the way that we let others treat us or what we think we deserve? Does our perceived intellectual aptitude influence the goals that we set for ourselves? If we thought we could do more - be smarter, wittier, more insightful – would we want to be?

Intrigued by the untapped potential that lay inside our heads, I began my career as a cognitive neuroscientist more than 30 years ago. As a researcher, I have seen brilliant people trapped by self-deception, haunted by a label from their youth, believing that they are not smart when in actuality they are incredibly bright. The truth is, pedigrees rarely predict who will be the most successful in life. Defining our worth and potential by our IQ, grades, test scores, and degrees (or lack there of) is detrimental and excessively limiting.

Our brain is the most changeable part of our whole body. It is rewiring everyday by how we use it – or don’t. We – to a great extent - determine its destiny. We can skillfully drive it to perform at an optimal level, race it into the ground or slowly smother its brilliance by submitting to life on autopilot. The ever-evolving nature of intelligence, our brain’s ability to adapt to incoming information, update our thoughts and feelings and recharge each night as we sleep demonstrates our brain’s incredible prowess. Being able to extract meaning from the world around us, from the most highbrow literature to the most inane television show, is ingenious. New ideas and innovative plans of action spring from our minds everyday, and yet we only notice when someone else tells us our brain has value or when our brain fails to perform as nimbly as we expect.

I have seen many people achieve what they once thought was inconceivable after embracing their capacity to change their mind, by overcoming their negative brain image and freeing themselves from whatever label has haunted them. For example, the young man who was told he would only achieve a minimal job after a stroke went on to graduate magna cum laude from a prestigious university. Or the Fortune 500 executive who had been told at age nine that he was just average but went on to start multiple successful companies.

And the young Navy SEAL who believed he would never be any better than the C or D high school student he was 10 years prior, who was recently accepted to a graduate program to study cognitive neuroscience and continues to raise the bar for his brain.

What science has proven and what each of these individuals embody is the fact that the way we think drives our overall brain health and performance.

Ultimately, we must all awaken to the fact that our brains are adaptable, repairable and trainable. Body image or brain image, both threaten to mask our true human potential and extraordinary value. My hope is that we all embrace a healthier life exercising, not only our bodies, but, also, our brains.

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Lyda Hill: Redefining Military Intelligence | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Lyda Hill: Redefining Military Intelligence

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, September 11, 2013

After a conversation with her nephew, an Air Force F-16 pilot and Iraq war veteran, about the need for philanthropic support for military causes, Lyda set her sights on finding the answer to the question, “What are we doing to help military men and women thrive after their time of duty?” She realized too little, too late. Now, Lyda is on a mission to make sure our troops, both in and out of uniform, get to enjoy the quality of life they so courageously defend.

Although much effort is dedicated to repairing the physical wounds of war, very few programs in the sea of goodwill address the invisible injuries of the mind with meaningful, long-term life change. “The lack of attention to brain health is creating a preventable barrier to attaining future financial, social and emotional success,” said Lyda. “Brain health is like physical health. You can actively pursue it. It’s up to you.”

Lyda’s passion to ease the transition to civilian life for service members, her unparalleled community leadership, keen visionary insight and generous two-million-dollar gift has ignited the creation of mobile Warrior Training Teams that will deliver scientifically proven programs, developed at the Center for BrainHealth, to a wider audience. The goal of the Brain Performance Institute Warrior Training Teams is to arm veteran and active duty service members with the necessary tools to achieve successful, enriching and fulfilling lives by proactively optimizing brain performance, building resilience in cognitive brain function, and reversing losses in cognitive capacity. “It’s a way to help bridge the gap from deployment to employment,” Lyda explained.

“Lyda’s gift has been truly transformative for the Brain Performance Institute and has allowed us to immediately begin realizing our vision to provide high performance brain training to a larger group of warriors around the country,” explained BPI executive director, Eric Bennett. “By capitalizing on the valuable leadership, decision-making, strategic thinking and problem-solving skills learned in the military, we will help warriors reach their brain potential and civilian life success.” 

With Lyda’s donation, a Warrior Training Team has already been dispatched to assess a group of 38 select special operation forces before their deployment. Upon their return, these elite service members will complete Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training (SMART), which has been scientifically proven to spur dramatic brain change after just hours of training.

“I am honored to be a part of the Warrior Training Team and to deliver a proven program, that profoundly affected my life, to my brothers and sisters in uniform,” said Jake Fuller, former Navy SEAL and inaugural Warrior Training Team member. “When I came back from deployment in November 2012, my stress level never dropped. I was subconsciously trying to keep my stress level at what I had become accustomed to in Afghanistan. SMART gave me the ability to move forward in the civilian world because I now know I am the driver of my most important tool for life success - my brain. To be able to give that opportunity to other service members is a privilege.”

When reflecting on those served by her magnanimous gift, Lyda said, “I am in awe of their willingness to protect our country for those they don’t even know. I want to thank each of them and let them know that the private sector is here to help. My greatest hope is that all of our military can be reintegrated into civilian society and enjoy the life that they have defended for their families.”

Pictured left: Lyda Hill with Warrior Training Team members and veterans Mike Rials, Jake Fuller and Jake Schick.

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Study Finds Brain Training Enhances Brain Health of Adults Over 50 | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Study Finds Brain Training Enhances Brain Health of Adults Over 50

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, September 9, 2013

Strategy-based cognitive training has the potential to reverse age-related brain decline according to the results of a study conducted by researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online in Cerebral Cortex. The novel study examining brain and cognitive changes associated with brain training has found that complex cognitive training significantly improves cognitive brain health.

“The world’s aging population is growing disproportionately. Our expected lifespan has reached an all time high of more than 78 years, yet previous research shows cognitive decline may begin in the early 40s,” said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHeath and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair at The University of Texas at Dallas. “Until recently, cognitive decline in healthy adults was viewed as an inevitable consequence of aging. This research shows that neuroplasticity can be harnessed to enhance brain performance and provides hope for individuals to improve their own mental capacity and cognitive brain health by habitually exercising higher-order thinking strategies no matter their age.”

The study found that 12 hours of directed brain training can alter brain function, inducing increased blood flow, enhanced information communication across key brain regions, and expansion of the structural connections between brain regions related to new learning. Using three MRI-based measurements, researchers examined brain changes across three time points in a randomized sample of individuals – 56 to 71 years of age. The study found three significant training-related brain changes at rest: increases in global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), greater synchrony in important brain networks, and increased white matter integrity, which is the wiring of the brain that allows information to travel between brain cells.

“Advances in imaging are allowing us to measure brain change in a short time period,” said Dr. Sina Aslan, founder and president of Advance MRI and collaborator on the study. “Through this research we are able to see that cognitive training increases brain blood flow, which is a sensitive physiological marker of brain health. Previous research shows brain blood flow decreases in people beginning in their 20s. The finding that global brain blood flow can be increased with complex mental activity, as this study demonstrates, suggests that staying mentally active helps reverse and potentially prevent brain losses and cognitive decline with aging.”

The capacity to increase whole brain blood flow after complex mental training may have clinical implications in both healthy aging populations and those diagnosed with brain disease such as Alzheimer’s, Dr. Aslan said.

“Greater levels of brain blood flow are associated with higher cognitive performance,” said Dr. Chapman. “With upwards of 8% increase in brain blood flow, this research shows that participants are regaining measurable brain health. The brain and cognitive gains may help achieve a ‘younger working’ brain with all the benefits of rich experience, knowledge-base and wisdom as manifested in an older brain.”

Chapman also suggested that the findings are important for younger adults and encourages adoption of healthy brain habits in early adulthood to stave off cognitive decline.

Also noteworthy was that researchers found significant improvement in cognitive performance as well as a significant relationship between brain changes and improved cognitive performance. Among the participants who were randomized into the brain training group, researchers saw improvement in two cognitive domains: strategic reasoning, which is the ability to synthesize generalized meanings or extract larger ideas from lengthy input, and a measure of executive function that demonstrates the ability to abstract concepts. As a follow up to the study, researchers have investigated how long the improvements have been maintained and have found that the brain gains measured have been maintained at one year post-training and longer.

Both the brain and cognitive plasticity changes in response to strategy-based mental training demonstrate the neurogenerative potential in the cognitively healthy aging brain.

“We are increasingly interested in examining cognitive change with age,” said Dr. Molly Wagster of the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, which co-funded the study.

“Most older Americans likely will experience subtle changes in their ability to learn and remember, and studies such as this, examining one way to possibly affect cognitive change, are important," she continued. "It advances our understanding of how cognitive training might affect brain changes associated with cognitive decline. While further study is needed, this research suggests that it may never be too late to participate in activities to maintain or even improve our cognitive health."

The research was funded by the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (1RCAG035954-01), the T. Boone Pickens Foundation, the Lyda Hill Foundation and the Dee Wyly Distinguished University Endowment.

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Brain Training to Transform and Improve Dallas Middle School | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Brain Training to Transform and Improve Dallas Middle School

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, August 26, 2013

Advanced reasoning skills in American adolescents are falling behind those of other developed countries. To combat the issue, Communities Foundation of Texas has awarded a $250,000 grant to the Center for BrainHealth to provide research-based high performance brain training for all students, teachers, leadership and parents at Thomas A. Edison Middle Learning Center in West Dallas.

“The brain’s frontal networks are undergoing extensive changes during adolescence, making middle school an optimal time to train innovative thinking and reasoning skills,” said Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth. “Elevating brainpower during this impressionable life stage is imperative to promote success in school, in the workforce and in life.”

Edison is located in the 11th poorest zip code in the nation; its student body consists of low socio- economic status (SES) Hispanic and African American students. Recent scientific studies show that growing up in poverty can shape the wiring and even physical dimensions of a young child’s brain, with negative effects on language, learning and attention.

The Center for BrainHealth-developed brain training program called SMART (Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training) has been scientifically proven to yield measurable results in middle school students at all socioeconomic levels. Longitudinal studies have showed higher grades and standardized test performance in SMART-trained students as well as improved higher-level reasoning ability by as much as 50%. Research shows students who participated in the SMART program are more likely to take higher-level classes, graduate from high school on time, attend college and lead productive, successful lives.

“We have seen the SMART program transform classrooms across the country,” said Dr. Jacquelyn Gamino, director of BrainHealth’s Adolescent Reasoning Initiative who has trained more than 200 teachers and 15,000 teens across the country. “Teachers who have implemented the program report a more energized, creative and thought-filled classroom, and parents have stated their children are more confident and excited to learn. By bringing the interactive and engaging SMART learning environment to an entire school, we will give every child at Edison greater opportunity to reach his or her academic potential.”

The generous Communities Foundation of Texas grant will fund comprehensive professional development training for all teachers and school leadership at Edison as well as provide parent education opportunities aimed at creating a supportive home environment. Nine English Language Arts and Reading teachers have been intensively trained to teach a series of 10, 45-minute SMART sessions, which encourage students to use higher-level thinking skills such as asking thoughtful questions and make meaningful connections to real world situations and discourage rote thinking and responses. The remaining 70 teachers and school leadership will be given skills to help incorporate the high performance brain training concepts into their existing curriculum. Once the initial professional development takes place, the Center for BrainHealth will remain a vital resource, providing additional in-classroom modeling and support for teachers, lesson planning, curriculum extension and additional professional development.

“This grant to Center for BrainHealth’s SMART program is one of the many ways Communities Foundation of Texas is strategically investing in at-risk middle school youth,” said Brent Christopher, Communities Foundation of Texas President and CEO. “Through the SMART program, teachers and students will have a new approach to learning that will have a life-changing impact thanks to BrainHealth’s innovative neuroscience-based approach.”

“Our teachers and students would not be able to receive this remarkable and invaluable program without the Communities Foundation support,” said Principal Derrick Spurlock. “Edison students are deserving of available resources to further their personal growth and development. The SMART program will provide a tremendous start to our middle school students and provide parents with the tools to support the strategies at home.”

The Center for BrainHealth hopes to scale the SMART program initiative even further to engage more public middle schools in Texas and across the country. “We hope to build on this momentum and eventually saturate other Texas middle schools with the SMART program,” said Kimber Hartmann, Center for BrainHealth’s development director. “With Communities Foundation of Texas’s initial investment, we are just beginning to create a proven model for national education and transformative academic excellence.”

Click here to learn more about the Communites Foundation of Texas.

Click here to learn more about the Center for BrainHealth's Adolescent Reasoning Initiative and SMART.

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Q&A with Caitlin Schraufnagel, Ph.D. | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Q&A with Caitlin Schraufnagel, Ph.D.

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, August 12, 2013

Tell us about your background and what led you to the Center for BrainHealth.

I’m a clinical psychologist. I started working with children and families and then went on to do assessments and therapy for individuals in a variety of settings. After that, I decided that I wanted to get more into the research side, and that’s what led me here.

What is your role at the Center?

I work on a study that involves treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Before our participants go into the treatment phase, we do a thorough assessment of mood, personality, and PTSD symptoms. I perform many of these assessments and am involved in the treatment aspect by providing cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and administering repetitive trancranial magnetic stiumulation (rTMS). I’m also in charge of scheduling and getting in touch with veterans, talking with them prior to and when they walk in the door. You play a lot of different roles when you’re involved in a research team, so those are the major things, but anything else that comes up I’m always happy to do.

What inspired you to work with veterans? Do you have a personal connection to your research?

I have worked with veterans and people who have experienced trauma in the past. I felt really compelled to work with this specific population, especially veterans. They have served our country and sacrificed so much, and I think that we really have a duty to respond and be as helpful as we can.

What has been the most exciting part of your work here?

It’s very exciting to be able to work with veterans and provide treatment that’s so innovative. We’re using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and it’s got a real cutting-edge factor to it! rTMS is a safe and noninvasive technology used to stimulate the brain. It may directly impact on the circuits of the brain associated with arousal mechanisms and temporarily lessen the overactive physiological response to past stressful events. We are testing whether combining CPT and rTMS will improve outcome.

When you’re not at work, what are your favorite hobbies and activities?

I have three daughters, so they take up a lot of my time! I run regularly and do some races; I did a half-marathon not too long ago, which was pretty cool. I also play the violin in a local orchestra.

 

To learn more about the Center's work with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in returning service members please click here.

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The Aging Brain: Why Older May Be Better | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

The Aging Brain: Why Older May Be Better

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Monday, July 22, 2013

When do you think your brain was operating at its peak performance? I ask this question frequently because it always amazes me how people respond. Invariably, they throw out ages at least ten to twenty years younger than they are currently. “When I was fifty,” say some, while others say, “When I was twenty-five,” and still others, “When I was six years old”—all are frequent ages that I hear.

The typical reaction reflects the assumption that our best brain years are behind us:

  • I was smartest twenty years ago, when I could remember phone numbers without a second thought.
  • I was smartest when I was in college, when I could absorb facts like a sponge.
  • I was smartest when I was in my thirties, with intellectual energy that never waned.
  • I was smartest when I was three years old; every day my knowledge increased dramatically.

Then I ask people, if you think you were smarter back then, could you perform what you are doing today, say, some twenty or thirty years ago? Not likely. Then why do we think we were sharper back then and not now? It is appalling that in a world where more people are living to be older than ever before, aging is still seen as a form of disease. We have grown to fully expect that cognitive decline is an inevitable consequence of aging, even though the majority of seniors aged eighty-five and older manifest a potential for well-preserved intellect, capacity for new learning, and sound decision making. We live believing our best brain years are in the past.

Brain aging is not, in fact, a vexation to be avoided; rather, it is a developmental process that adds valuable perspective to the brain’s existing higher-order thinking abilities. Your brain may be getting older; but if continually fine-tuned, it should also be getting more efficient. And smarter, too. In healthy brain aging, your goal should not be to look for the fountain of youth mythical elixir to return to our younger brain state. Rather, the goal should be to maintain and strengthen your brain’s robustness.

Keep reminding yourself, if you do not work to improve your brain, you will go backward. For your brain’s well-being, you want to keep progressing. If I were to take ten or twenty years off your brain, you would beg me to have the years back because they are packed with such rich developments, that is, if you properly fostered your brain fitness. If you think brains are optimally performing in thirty-something-year-olds, have them make a decision or two for you.

Even more exciting is the news that brain aging can have some clear advantages when compared to the young adult brain. There are more decisive pieces to your brain puzzle as you age than speed and amount of fact recall. Certain pivotal brain functions do not have to get slowly worse and can even get better.

As a thriving society, we must change the negative framing of brain aging and instead harness the full frontal potential of our brain’s capacity throughout life (where more wrinkles on the brain, by the way, are a good thing since brain wrinkles indicate a larger cortex—gray matter!) and more fully strive to achieve the brain potential that is yet to come.

To learn more about healthy brain habits to improve your brain health at any age, check out Dr. Chapman's book, Make Your Brain Smarter or visit www.makeyourbrainsmarter.com

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Brain Games: Are They Worth It? | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

Brain Games: Are They Worth It?

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Friday, June 28, 2013

 

I’m often asked if brain games such as crossword puzzles, Sudoku or even training websites are beneficial to brain health. The answer – yes and no.

Your brain is the most complex­­ and truly amazing organ in your body. The key to investing in our brain now and our cognitive reserve for the future lies largely within our remarkable frontal lobe and its deep connections to other brain areas, as well as ceasing many of our brain habits that work against healthy frontal lobe function.

There is not sufficient evidence to suggest brain games can significantly improve an individual’s cognitive ability. What we do know is that brain games improve the specific function that is being trained, but the learnings do not spill over to other untrained areas of function and do not elevate critical frontal lobe brain functions such as decision making, planning and judgment. Games such as crosswords and Sudoku or online brain training programs make you better at those specific games, but do not improve your greater cognitive function.

To my knowledge, there has been little to no research to validate long-term benefits from brain games beyond improvement in specific tasks. Although fun and engaging, just like in exercise, when you stop doing the exercises, your brain loses the immediate gains.

What I have found through my research are three key frontal lobe processes that are responsible for higher-order brain function: strategic attention, integrated reasoning, and mental flexibility. These cognitive processes are keys to building robust frontal lobe function that will promote mental independence throughout life. To boost your brain power and maximize your cognitive performance, write down the take home messages of the next movie you watch or book you read. For more information on practical steps to build and maintain healthy brain function, click here.

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Brain Performance Institute - The Epicenter for Cognitive Training | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Brain Performance Institute - The Epicenter for Cognitive Training

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, May 31, 2013

America is facing a brain drain, especially as Boomers age. Innovation and critical reasoning are sinking compared to other developed nations, and general population studies indicate cognitive decline begins in the early forties. So, how do we insure ourselves against the increasingeconomic and social costs of cognitive decline?

Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman has spent the last 30 years investigating the immense capacity of the brain to rewire itself in health, after brain injury or in the presence of brain disease. Her findings reveal that most everyone has the capacity to increase their intellectual capital and maximize their cognitive potential.

Since founding the Center for BrainHealth in 1999, Dr. Chapman and her team have made incredible strides translating rapidly emerging innovations into solutions that improve cognitive health for research participants. Armed with hard evidence that humans can strengthen their brain performance, regain cognitive losses, and reverse declines, the Center for BrainHealth is now compelled to make available to the public its scientifically proven techniques that extend the brain span to more closely match the gains in the human lifespan.

In a show of support that will bring brain science research benefits to the community, the UT System Regents approved construction of a $33 million extension of the Center for BrainHealth that will be known as the Brain Performance Institute. Once funding is secured, the newly constructed 67,500-square-foot-facility will house the Institute’s national headquarters, where the latest brain research and training techniques will be available to all individuals to help them increase their mental edge.

Financial services leader and entrepreneur, Eric Bennett, is leaving his position as CEO of one of the largest and most successful wealth management firms in Texas to become Executive Director of the Brain Performance Institute. Mr. Bennett, co-founder of Tolleson Wealth Management, has been on the Advisory Board to the Center for the last several years. “I have never seen an idea that could have a bigger and more positive impact on the world. BPI will allow the incredible brain research done at the Center to come alive and improve the lives of others. I wanted to have a key role in making this happen.”

The Institute’s location near the Center for BrainHealth and UT Southwestern Medical Center will allow scientists, research clinicians and graduate students to use technologies and methodologies to help expand and strengthen brain performance at all ages. Brain training experts will work with diverse individuals, the majority in health, but also those with brain injury and disease. Targeted programs will benefit corporate executives and community leaders, middle schoolers and teens, veterans and athletes, and individuals diagnosed with autism, multiple sclerosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Alzheimer’s disease and other ailments.

The Brain Performance Institute will guide and train people to transform their cognitive brain health, and therefore their lives. One of the Institute’s first offerings will be BrainHealth’s signature program, Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training (SMART). Research revealed increases in brain blood flow in healthy adults equivalent to regaining years of brain health and 30% gains in higher-order reasoning in teens across socioeconomic levels. SMART also showed increases in cognitive performance and decreases in depressive symptoms for veterans and civilians who experienced a brain injury as recently as six months ago to more than 30 years ago.

 “Expanding and extending the cognitive brain span is the next major frontier to further explore and solve,” Chapman said.  We are grateful that the UT System Regents have taken the first step to make our vision of an epicenter of brain health fitness a reality.”

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Study Finds Correlation Between Depression and Structural Brain Differences in Retired NFL Players | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Study Finds Correlation Between Depression and Structural Brain Differences in Retired NFL Players

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, May 28, 2013

 

A study led by the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas examining the brains of former National Football League players has found that structural brain differences in athletes with concussion histories may predict developing depressive symptoms.

 
Researchers from the Center for BrainHealth say their novel study, published online in the May 24, 2013 issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, identified for the first time, a correlation between depression and cerebral white-matter abnormalities in former players with a remote history of concussion. Among the players who were found to have depression, researchers found disrupted integrity in the brains’ white matter, which is connective tissue that allows information to travel from brain cell to brain cell.

 

“Football players often sustain numerous concussive and subconcussive head injuries,” said Dr. John Hart, director of the BrainHealth Institute for Athletes at the Center for BrainHealth and corresponding author of the study. “With these biomarkers, we may one day be able to predict who is at risk for developing depression after a concussion.”

 

Since 2010, 26 ex-NFL players, ranging in age from 41 to 79, underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scanning and detailed neurologic and neuropsychologic assessments. Researchers also gathered detailed retrospective histories of mental status and concussion experiences. The retired athletes, on average, had more than eight years experience in the NFL and reported having from 1 to 11 concussions, with an average of 3.85. 

 

“Depression can develop years after a head injury in these players and at times go undiagnosed.  Knowing that an individual is at risk could one day improve detection and diagnosis,” reports Dr. Hart.

 

Other researchers on the study included Dr. Nyaz Didehbani, Dr. Elizabeth Bartz, Jeremy Strain, Heather Conover and Sethesh Mansinghani, all of UT Dallas; Dr. Kyle Womack, who holds appointments at both UT Dallas and UT Southwestern; and Dr. Michael A. Kraut, who holds appointments at both UT Dallas and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 

The study was supported by the BrainHealth Institute for Athletes at the Center for BrainHealth.

 

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Dr. Chapman’s TEDx Talk | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Dr. Chapman’s TEDx Talk

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, May 8, 2013

On May 4, 2013 Dr. Sandra Chapman presented Make Your Brain Smart: It's Not What You Think  at TEDxRockCreekPark.

 

 

Your brain is wired to be inspired. Now, that is an idea worth spreading!

Make Your Brain Smarter: It's Not What You Think

Watch, rewire, and share!

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TED and “The Hero’s Journey” to Smarter | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

TED and “The Hero’s Journey” to Smarter

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Tuesday, April 16, 2013

I am honored to announce that on May 4, 2013, I will present my first TED talk at TEDxRockCreekPark in Alexandria, Virginia. That day, it will be my privilege to join a diverse group of ten inspirational thought leaders, which include NY Times best-selling authors David Shenk and Alan Fine as well as award-winning director, Pat Solomon (Finding Joe).

I am so excited to be a part of this globally recognized platform from which I will share with you, and the millions who visit TED.com in search of “ideas worth spreading,” that being smarter is possible just by changing the way you think.  My talk, “Make Your Brain Smarter: It’s Not What You Think”, aims to dispel outdated misconceptions about what smart is, share cutting-edge advancements in technology that reveal how thinking smarter rewires the brain, and provide insights to achieving higher brain performance across the lifespan.

Popular TED talks in the past have reached upwards of 15 million views and TEDx events have generated more than 78 million views on YouTube.  Imagine what we can accomplish by inspiring an audience of that magnitude to achieve better brain health. Imagine the potential of millions of people embracing their ability to think smarter. It is my dream to let the world know that we are no longer confined by the old definition of smart and that the brain is the most changeable part of the entire body, possessing a scientifically proven ability to strengthen at any stage of life.

The TEDxRockCreekPark event is designed to celebrate the hero’s journey; a call to adventure that is refuted before it is accepted and ultimately obtained after overcoming seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Greater cognitive performance arises when we embrace healthy brain habits and refute commonly held beliefs that limit our potential.  The path to maximizing brain performance and the social, economic and personal benefits that follow are attainable, but first, we must all recognize that attending to brain health is important whether you are young or old.

My talk on May 4 is the culmination of over 30 years of research combined with months working with experts at TEDxRockCreekPark to pack the most powerful message possible into 10 thought-provoking minutes that explore the possibilities of harnessing your cognitive potential and inspire you to take charge of your brain health and make sure that your best brain years are yet to come.

I hope that you will join me on this exciting journey as I share with you the transformative research revealing the immense capacity of the human brain and its infinite potential. Invite your friends and family as we embark on the next step to taking the brain health movement worldwide.

For more information please visit TEDxRockCreekPark or TED.com.

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Symposium to Explore Neuroscience of Addiction | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Symposium to Explore Neuroscience of Addiction

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, March 22, 2013

Dr. Francesca Filbey

Dr. Francesca Filbey

 

The Reprogramming the Human Brain Symposium, an annual research and treatment conference organized in part by the Center for BrainHealth, will concentrate this year on the cognitive neuroscience of decision-making and addiction.

The event, which brings together some of neuroscience’s most advanced researchers, is co-sponsored by the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute at The University of California, Berkeley, where this year’s symposium will be held March 28.

In a talk titled “Reward-Centricity in Marijuana Users,” the Center for BrainHealth’s Dr. Francesca Filbey will present data showing that the compulsion for chronic marijuana use is driven by a heightened sensitivity to rewards, not a desire to avoid adverse states.

Other symposium topics will include reward-based decision-making; neural mechanisms of goal-directed and habitual control; state and trait modulators of immediate reward bias in alcohol-use disorders; dopamine and decision-making; and the role of dopamine in food-related behavior.

Held alternately at the Center for BrainHealth and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, the symposium has featured some of the most distinguished neuroscientists and medical investigators in the country.

Dr. Daniel R. Weinberger, M.D.

Dr. Daniel R. Weinberger

This year’s keynote speaker will be the Charles L. Branch BrainHealth Award recipient, Dr. Daniel R. Weinberger, director and CEO of the Leiber Institute for Brain Development in Baltimore. The award was created in 2010 to honor neuroscientists who have made noteworthy breakthroughs in brain discoveries.

Weinberger, who will discuss gene networks and brain networks, has an international reputation as the pre-eminent scientist in schizophrenia research. He has been at the forefront of scientific investigation into this illness and related disorders for a generation. He is most noted for his expertise in genetic components of schizophrenia, but is also recognized for his insights into dopamine’s role in the brain, which has implications for many other disorders, including addiction.

For more information, visit the symposium page.

To learn more about participating in Dr. Filbey's study, click here.

 

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Q & A with Melissa Reiff | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Q & A with Melissa Reiff

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, March 22, 2013

President of The Container Store, Melissa Reiff, answered questions from Center for BrainHealth’s founder and chief director, Dr. Sandi Chapman, including how her definition of smart has changed and how The Container Store's focus on brain health helps build smarter employees.

The “Organized Life. Sharp Mind.” partnership between The Container Store and Center for BrainHealth is the driving force behind the annual sell-out lecture series, The Brain: An Owner’s Guide, held each February at the Center. This April, the series will feature an additional presentation from Dr. Chapman on April 23. For more information or tickets click here.

Sandi: Do you think people realize they can become smarter?

Melissa: I think as people mature and grow older, they sometimes have a misconception that there’s a stopping point to becoming smarter.  We know that is just not true and we have to continue to educate and inform everyone about how the brain works and how they can continue to grow their knowledge as they age.  I think we all crave tangible tips and tricks that help exercise our brain, expand our experiences, and push us to try things that might be new and challenging. And we all must spend much more time studying brain health and what it REALLY means to be SMART.  We know it’s not about simply having a good memory - there is much more to learn.

Sandi: How have you reframed what it means to be smarter versus the things you thought were making you smarter, but actually work against brain health.

Melissa: Well, as someone who really used to pride myself on how many plates I could keep spinning at one time, successfully I thought, I’ve learned over the last few years – with much help from the Center for BrainHealth – that by focusing on one particular thing at a particular time truly forces you to clear your mind and concentrate. It forces you to truly be present on the particular task, or project, or conversation at hand, AND, most importantly, the outcome produces even BETTER results! I’m still working on this “not multi-tasking as much” and yes, I still have to work on it.  It’s hard. And with all of the devices and technology we have access to these days, it’s very distracting and adds to multi-tasking syndrome. But, I’m determined, and through strong will and discipline, we can all get better at practicing this focus every single day.

Sandi: What was the most important take-home message for you about how our missions interconnect?

Melissa: As the Original Storage and Organization Store, we believe that being organized promotes a sharp mind. When things are orderly, less cluttered and we can access things easily, that means we are less stressed and have more time to focus on the things we need to be focusing on – not in a frenzy searching for things or feeling overwhelmed that our surroundings are unorganized.  Brain health is a topic that we know continues to resonate with our customers and employees alike. Unfortunately, we all do get older...but that doesn’t mean we don’t want to grow our knowledge, intuition, and live the best, most intelligent, sharp lives as possible. 

Sandi: How do you think The Container Store builds smarter individuals – both employees and customers?

Melissa: We know our employees and our customers are similar – people who strive to learn more, communicate more effectively and be more productive.  Through our extensive training programs for our employees, we want to strengthen our strategic thinking skills and creative innovation every day – whether that’s in our personal or our professional lives.  And through our interactions with our customers, we hope to help them create an organized life – sharper, smarter life. Brain health is critical to all of our futures in leading full, vibrant and impactful lives.

Sandi: How has that affected the company's culture and its customers?

Melissa: Our employees really appreciate that we pursue creative, innovative partnerships like the one we’ve had for more than five years with the Center for BrainHealth.  It’s definitely now a topic that’s more at the forefront of our employees' and customers' interests. And the subject of brain health is prevalent and referred to often as part of our employee-first culture as we learn more as a company about how to grow and exercise our brains to be the very best we can be as colleagues, salespeople, friends and family members.

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When in doubt, sit it out. New concussion guidelines stress an individualized approach. | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

When in doubt, sit it out. New concussion guidelines stress an individualized approach.

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, March 20, 2013

New concussion guidelines focus on assessing, diagnosing and managing concussions on an individualized basis, emphasizing a more conservative approach for younger people. The guidelines released Monday by the American Academy of Neurology, signal a departure from the old three-tiered grading scale, which allowed return to play for athletes classified with the mildest concussion just a few minutes after impact. Now, all concussions require that a player “sit it out” until a licensed health care professional has determined that the concussion has resolved, and there is no set time limit for that.

Of the new guidelines, Center for BrainHealth’s head of pediatric brain injury, Lori Cook, Ph.D., said, “I think it’s great that they put an emphasis on the developing brain versus the mature brain. The after-effects of injury can be very different and could be much more detrimental to a developing child or adolescent brain than an adult brain.”

“They do a great job of addressing how to manage and facilitate short-term recovery, which is so important, because, if managed well, it ameliorates the chances of long-term difficulties. However, some evidence indicates that as many as 20% may still have trouble even if their case is managed well. Establishing guidelines for long-term monitoring is still needed. We know there is a lot that can be done if deficits do appear. Brain training interventions like the SMART program we developed at the Center for BrainHealth, can promote increased brain performance. In cases of pediatric concussions, individuals need to be followed, utilizing short monitoring sessions, until the brain fully develops at around age 25 to make sure deficits are addressed as they appear. ”

She explained that for a child who experiences a concussion, cognitive deficits may not manifest until adolescence when the brain is called upon to perform higher-order reasoning and critical thinking tasks. Signs of cognitive deficits include problems with learning, change in personality, or decline in attention span. Anxiety and depression may also appear years after a concussion. Including a psychiatric assessment during the recommended neuropsychological testing at the time of the concussion’s diagnosis would help characterize potential risk factors.

When asked when is the best time to implement brain training to help individuals regain brain performance, Dr. Cook explained, “There is so much spontaneous healing that goes on in the brain in the early days, weeks and, sometimes, even months after an injury. We would want to wait to address the cognitive aspects after those physical signs of healing have resolved. When to introduce SMART is largely dependent on an individual’s age and the seriousness of the injury.

BrainHealth’s founder and chief director, Dr. Sandi Chapman, worked with the guidelines’ lead author, Christopher C. Giza, M.D., and several other experts to help develop a national pediatric acquired brain injury plan, which is scheduled to go before the U.S. Senate this summer. Dr. Chapman commented, “It’s phenomenal to have this set of guidelines. People in the field want to know what to do, and now everyone will be better informed, from players and parents, to coaches and medical professionals.” Dr. Chapman was pleased with the “pre-participation counseling” aspect of the guidelines, which stressed the importance of educating parents and athletes about the risks associated with concussions. “We differ [from the published guidelines] in that we believe in a more pro-active approach to follow-up. If cognitive difficulties persist after other concussion symptoms have disappeared, it’s really important to get brain training to rebuild the brain to pre-concussion levels.”

Both Dr. Chapman and Dr. Cook agree that the new guidelines are an important starting point for concussion prevention, diagnosis and acute treatment, but more needs to be done to understand risk-factors and solutions for long-term concussion deficits.

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BrainHealth Study with Former NFL Players Published in JAMA Neurology | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

BrainHealth Study with Former NFL Players Published in JAMA Neurology

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, January 7, 2013

A study led by the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas examining the neuropsychological status of former National Football League players has found that cognitive deficits and depression are more common among retired players than in the general population.

But researchers from the Center for BrainHealth and from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center say their study, published online today in JAMA Neurology, also is significant for what it did not find: evidence of cognitive impairment in the majority of ex-players.

Many former NFL players who took part in our study, even those with extensive concussion histories, are healthy and cognitively normal,” said Dr. John Hart Jr., medical science director at the Center for BrainHealth and director of the BrainHealth Institute for Athletes that was created to address the long-term effects of sports-related traumatic brain injuries. “In 60 percent of our participants – most of whom had sustained prior concussions – we found no cognitive problems, no mood problems and no structural brain abnormalities. Many former NFL players think that because they played football or had concussions, they are certain to face severe neurological consequences, but that is not always the case.”

Dr. Hart, who is the study’s lead author and holds a joint appointment at UT Southwestern as a professor of neurology and psychiatry, said the investigation is the largest comprehensive study of former NFL players that involves the use of neuropsychological testing, neurological assessments and neuroimaging.

Former Dallas Cowboy fullback Daryl Johnston, who participated in the study and helped recruit other players to take part, said: “Having played 11 years in the NFL and taken countless hits, I’ve heard about the struggles of the players who came before me and the challenges regarding their quality of life. Through the Center for BrainHealth, former players can find out if there is an issue, and if you catch it early or late, there are things you can do to improve your condition. The brain is regenerative for life, and we can restore faculties that just a few years ago were thought to be lost forever.”

Since 2010, 34 ex-NFL players with a mean age of nearly 62 underwent detailed neurological and neuropsychological assessments measuring aspects of intelligence, cognitive flexibility, processing speed, language skills, memory and mood. Researchers also gathered detailed retrospective histories of mental status and concussion experiences, and examined motor and sensory functions, gait and reflexes. Twenty-six of the ex-players also underwent detailed diffusion tensor MRIs. All but two of the 34 players reported having experienced at least one concussion, with 13 as the highest reported number.

Also noteworthy was that, for the first time, researchers identified a correlation between cognitive impairment and cerebral white-matter abnormalities. Among the players who were found to have cognitive deficits or depression, researchers found disrupted integrity in the brains’ white matter, which is connective tissue that allows information to travel from brain cell to brain cell. There were also associated brain blood flow changes in those who developed cognitive impairments, providing clues to the active brain changes resulting in deficits.

Some of the players do have some form of cognitive impairment. Four were diagnosed as having fixed cognitive deficits, eight as having mild cognitive impairment and two had dementia. When compared to healthy, age-matched control subjects, the former football players generally had more difficulty on neuropsychological tests that dealt with naming, word finding, and visual and verbal episodic memory.

About 24 percent of the players were diagnosed with depression, including six who never before had been diagnosed or treated. The rate of depression in an age-matched general population is about 10 percent to 15 percent, said neuropsychologist Dr. Munro Cullum, the study’s senior author and a professor of psychiatry and neurology at UT Southwestern.

The findings could have implications beyond the football field, particularly in the areas of aging and Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Cullum said.

"There is still so much we don’t know about concussions and later life function, nor do we know who is vulnerable to cognitive problems later in life,” Dr. Cullum said. “Severe and moderate head injuries have been identified as a potential risk factor for Alzheimer’s. We’re still learning about concussions.”

Other researchers on the study included Dr. Nyaz Didehbani, Dr. Elizabeth Bartz, Jeremy Strain, Heather Conover and Sethesh Mansinghani, all of UT Dallas; Dr. Kyle Womack, who holds appointments at both UT Dallas and UT Southwestern; Dr. Hanzhang Lu of UT Southwestern; and Dr. Michael A. Kraut, who holds appointments at both UT Dallas and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The study was supported by the BrainHealth Institute for Athletes at the Center for BrainHealth.

 

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Aging Does Not Impair Decision-Making, Age Does Provide Some Cognitive Benefits | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Aging Does Not Impair Decision-Making, Age Does Provide Some Cognitive Benefits

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Contrary to conventional wisdom that cognitive function declines beginning in the mid-forties, aging does not correlate with deteriorating ability to think for ourselves.  These are the findings of “Healthy Brain, Healthy Decisions: The MetLife Study of Decision-Making Potential,”one of the first projects to investigate the connection between cognitive health, aging and decision making capacity.  The research was conducted with men and women in their 50s, 60s and 70s by the Center for BrainHealth and the MetLife Mature Market Institute. The study demonstrates that age alone is not a key factor in predicting the ability to make decisions.

Focusing on healthy adults in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, the researchers found that those who demonstrated smart decision-making also excelled at strategic learning—the ability to sift more important information from the less important. 

Although study participants in all three life stages had about the same strategic learning abilities, the oldest participant group slightly surpassed the rest, implying strategic learning capacity may actually increase with age in normally functioning adults.

Additional findings show that older study participants (those in their 70s) were more conscientious, remained vigilant (i.e., considered their options before making a decision) and avoided being hyper-vigilant (i.e., focused on immediate solutions without considering other outcomes) when compared to the younger group (those in their 50s). 

Researchers gauged participants’ financial conscientiousness (i.e., being careful and organized) using a series of questions regarding monthly budgeting practices and financial retirement plans. The full study, along with consumer tips Is Your Decision-Making Style Healthy?, is available here.

The Healthy Brain, Healthy Decisions project contends that previous large sample studies documenting declines in the ability to think logically and solve problems, starting as early as age 40, fail to identify individual factors which contribute to declining decision-making capacity, such as early dementia or other medical causes. Moreover, they ignore such positive age-related aspects as extensive life experience, reasoning ability and accumulated knowledge that may preserve or even enhance decision-making.

“Combining these findings with emerging evidence of retained cognitive brain health in aging suggests that policies aimed at protecting those most vulnerable to poor decision-making should focus on impairment caused by an underlying medical condition, rather than age itself, as a risk factor,”said Sandra Timmermann, Ed.D., director of the MetLife Mature Market Institute.  “Rather than attributing impaired decision-making to age alone, approaches that assess an individual’s strategic learning ability and cognitive function can improve our understanding of decision-making capacity at all ages and between genders.”

“The study findings are a crucial first step to move beyond age as a demographic factor used to explain impaired decision-making,” said Sandra Chapman, Ph.D., founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. “Policies and practices that focus exclusively on age-related declines in decision-making will unnecessarily curtail the autonomy of older adults with preserved cognitive function. Age is not a disease, therefore noticeable drops in mental decline warrant medical attention to determine cause and best course of action. Maximizing cognitive potential is possible across the lifespan.”

Among the study’s key findings are the following:

Healthy aging adults show no decline in decision-making - Older decision-makers were as logically consistent as younger decision-makers.  Increased age alone — from the early 50s through the late 70s — was not a key factor in predicting impaired decision-making capacity. 

Strategic learning capacity may actually increase with age- All three age groups were comparable as strategic learners.  Those in their 70s performed at least as well as the 50s age group on a cognitive measure of strategic learning. All groups performed similarly when asked to filter the most relevant information from the extraneous.

Strategic learners are less likely to fall victim to bias toward riskier options - Participants who performed well in sifting important information on the strategic learning measure, a tool used by researchers, made more logically consistent financial decisions. Those who performed poorly on strategic learning were less logically consistent and showed more bias toward riskier choices resulting in potential financial gain or loss.

Conscientious decision-making intensifies with age – A self-assessment revealedolder decision-makers were more conscientious (i.e., careful and organized) than those in the younger age group.

Risk tolerance can be linked to cognitive ability - Overall, men and women performed equally at logically consistent decision-making and at strategic learning.  In both men and women, strategic learning proficiency was associated with the ability to make logically consistent (risk averse) decisions.  

There were differences between men and women in the relationship between decision-making and traditional measures of cognitive function- Men with average cognitive function demonstrated the highest risk-seeking (lowest logical consistency) in decision-making of any group. Men in the superior cognitive range were the most conservative followed by women in the average cognitive range. Decision-making and what impacts risk-aversion and risk-seeking are of particular interest since women become the lead decision-makers later in life due to loss of spouses and longer life spans.

Methodology
The Healthy Brain, Healthy Decisions study, available online, was conducted by the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas and the University of California, San Francisco in partnership with the MetLife Mature Market Institute from October 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012. A sample of 72 adults (31 men and 41 women) was recruited from the Dallas-Fort Worth community. Ages were evenly divided between men and women within each of the three decades (50s, 60s, and 70s).

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Q&A with Jeremy Strain | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Q&A with Jeremy Strain

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, December 13, 2012

How has the Center influenced your work?

I started with the Center for BrainHealth in 2009 as an intern my senior year at The University of Texas at Dallas. I am now a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. From the beginning, I have been able to work with two of my mentors, Dr. Kyle Womack and Dr. John Hart. They have introduced me to a wealth of knowledge and innovative technologies, such as Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), which illustrates how two brain regions communicate.

What do you do at the Center for BrainHealth?

My work focuses on employing DTI, which provides a way to analyze levels of white matter impairment, to illuminate how connections in the brain get disrupted, especially in regards to dementia and traumatic brain injury. This noninvasive technology equips my research to be applicable to a wide range of neurological issues.

What will your research tell us?

I am proposing a study that will analyze the density of white matter hyperintensities, or areas of disruption, as a more extensive measure in differentiating between dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and mild cognitive impairment. In this study, DTI will be the main tool employed to assess the level of disruption in pathways linking various brain regions. Currently, DTI is not widely utilized in the medical realm, but is essential in furthering future medical breakthroughs. The results of my research will hopefully illustrate the importance of DTI as a clinically relevant tool that can predict future impairments from present injuries or stages of cognitive decline.

What is the best or most interesting thing about your job?

The people I work with at the Center for BrainHealth make it exciting to come to work every day. I thoroughly enjoy collaborating with scientists whose goals, such as meaningfully contributing to the scientific community and society as a whole, are similar to mine. My co-workers are not only positive influences in my life, but also mentors who constantly encourage me to reach my potential.

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2013 Lecture Series Announced | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

The Voice of BrainHealth

2013 Lecture Series Announced

By: Emily Bywaters, B.A.
Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The Center for BrainHealth announced its annual sell-out public lecture series lineup today. The Brain: An Owner’s Guide, made possible by the generosity and vision of The Container Store, was designed to translate the latest brain research and treatment developments into cutting-edge topical lectures for the lay community. The four-part series, held at 2200 W. Mockingbird Lane, begins February 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. and continues each Tuesday night throughout the month.

“The lecture series provides a rare opportunity to hear about groundbreaking research directly from experts in the field,” Melissa Reiff, president of The Container Store, said. “We are always looking for innovative opportunities to become ingrained in causes and community endeavors that help allow our customers to live their best, most productive and organized life. The lecture series fits that description perfectly,” she explained.

Prominent brain research leaders from across the country will speak about ways to enhance and maintain brainpower across the lifespan; the mind’s influence over our thoughts and actions; secret decisions and emotions that shape our lives; and the Internet’s effect on the brain and information perception. “The more knowledge we can share about the brain, the more we can empower individuals to take charge of their cognitive health,” Dr. Sandra Chapman, the Center for BrainHealth’s founder and chief director, said.

For the first time in several years, Dr. Chapman will join the series to discuss her latest undertakings. “Research at the Center for BrainHealth has shown the majority of humans can increase their intellectual capital, build cognitive resilience, and harness the immense capacity of their brain to strengthen and rewire itself in health, injury and disease. To achieve such gains requires concerted and lasting effort. Brain health fitness is not a quick fix,” she explained. “My vision is to change the way individuals think and act about their brain and its health daily. Through the lecture series, we are shining a spotlight on the vast potential of the human mind.”

The Brain: An Owner’s Guide series lectures schedule:

February 5: The Dee Wyly Lecture - SOLD OUT
Make Your Brain Smarter
Sandra Chapman, Ph.D.

Dr. Chapman, the founder & chief director of the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and author of Make Your Brain Smarter – Increase Your Brain’s Creativity, Energy and Focus, will share why your brain health matters today and provide a proven plan to maximize your cognitive potential. Learn how to enhance your brain performance and how to continually strengthen your greatest natural resource: your brain.
UPDATE: New Lecture Date Added - April 23, 2013 - Click here to purchase tickets

February 12: The Emy Lou & Jerry Baldridge Lecture
Who’s in Charge? Free Will & the Science of the Brain
Michael Gazzaniga, Ph.D.
Dr. Michael Gazzaniga, founder of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society and Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, will share his theories on how the mind “constrains” the brain. With ingenious insight and humor, hear from the world leader of modern cognitive neuroscience about the science of our responsibility and culpability. Dr. Gazzaniga currently directs the SAGE Center for the Study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

February 19: The J. Baxter Brinkmann Lecture
The Secret Lives of the Brain
David Eagleman, Ph.D.
Dr. David Eagleman, author of New York Times bestseller, Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, will take you on a thrilling exploration of the mind, leaving you asking: how much of our lives are steered by decisions and emotions that fly under the radar of conscious awareness? Dr. Eagleman directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action at the Baylor College of Medicine.

February 26: The Philip R. Jonsson Foundation Lecture
How the Internet is Molding Your Mind
Lewis Lapham
Mr. Lapham, founder and Editor of Lapham’s Quarterly, will describe how we encounter various subjects on the Internet and rely on labels to dictate our responses and ways of thinking. Learn how the Internet has changed the brain and the ways in which we perceive information. For almost 30 years, Mr. Lapham was the editor of Harper’s Magazine, the second oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. He remains Editor Emeritus for Harper’s in addition to having authored numerous books.

Ticket Info:

 All lectures will be held at the Center for BrainHealth, 2200 West Mockingbird Lane in Dallas. The price is $35 for a single ticket to one lecture, $45 for a ticket at the door and $130 for a series pass to all four lectures.
UPDATE: Only Reception Hall seating remains. Auditorium seating is sold out. For more information or to register, please visit http://lectureseries13.eventbrite.com/#.

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Addressing Head Injuries in Athletes of All Ages | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

From the Chief Director

Addressing Head Injuries in Athletes of All Ages

By: Sandra Bond Chapman, Ph.D.
Monday, December 10, 2012

In a speech at the Harvard School of Public Health, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell spoke of the cultural shift needed within the league to help reduce the risk of head injuries and significant brain traumas.

“Changing the culture in a way that reduces the injury risk to the maximum possible extent — especially the risk of head injury,” he said. “We want players to enjoy long and prosperous careers and healthy lives off the field. So we focus relentlessly on player health and safety, while also keeping the game fun and unpredictable.”

As Founder and Chief Director of the Center for BrainHealth, I am passionate about bringing more awareness to the issues of brain health and what we can be doing to improve cognitive performance – not just for professional athletes but for athletes of all ages.

Fear has been a common theme in the discussion of concussions in athletes – particularly in our youth. Dr. Robert Cantu recently published an editorial in The New York Times where he argued that children under the age of 14 should not be playing tackle football, heading a soccer ball should be against the rules until age 14, body checking should be banned in ice hockey until age 14 and headfirst slides should be eliminated in youth baseball and softball.

While the conversation about concussions and their effects is a good one to have, it should not be clouded by overwhelming fear. Here are my thoughts on this often controversial subject.

  • Player safety is of upmost importance. Proper equipment and rules and regulations need to be in place to protect not only the head safety, but the overall safety of athletes of all ages. Return to play rules need outlined and enacted if a head injury is suspected. One of the biggest contributors to concussions is the brain’s environment. While no headgear is going to fully protect the brain from being injured by the skull’s protruding inner surfaces that act like weapons of destruction as the brain rams against them, protecting player safety is paramount.
  • Get a comprehensive benchmark and baseline measurement of brain function. Having a brain benchmark measurement allows medical professionals to monitor brain changes with the developing brain or before or after injury. Athletes get routine annual complete physicals; it is more crucial to get a comprehensive BrainHealth Physical.
  • Strength training is key. Athletes of all ages need to be involved in strength conditioning; in particular, it is important for children who play contact sports to strengthen their neck muscles.
  • If a concussion is suspected, seek medical attention. Head injuries take time to heal and that is especially true in the case of children and young adults. See a qualified medical professional, preferably a neurologist with experience in concussions, for diagnosis and treatment. Medical care and player safety trumps all else.
  • Rest and restrict. Whereas physical activity is often restricted after a concussion, cognitive rest is a key factor in brain injury recovery as well. Limit the use of computers, cell phones, video games, television time and schoolwork. 
  • Fourteen is not a magic number. While Dr. Cantu recommends restricted play for children under the age of 14, there is nothing magical about that age in terms of brain development. In fact, the brain is undergoing continuous development throughout our lifetime. Specifically, the brain’s frontal lobes – often the most injured part of the brain during a concussion – develop until late 20s. Delayed sports training may dampen the development of critical physical skills to excel in sports.
  • Monitor and mitigate long-term deficits. For particularly young children, the long-term effects may not be evident until later developmental stages. My team was first to document this neurocognitive stall in pediatric patients who suffered a brain injury. Additionally, whereas previously children who had a concussion (i.e., “mild” brain injury) were thought to recover cognitive function within the normal range in the long term, there is increasing evidence that full recovery after concussion may not extend to all children, especially when more complex cognitive functions are considered. Center for BrainHealth researchers have found that some children (as many as one in five) who had a concussion demonstrated comparable difficulties to children with severe brain injuries in higher-order reasoning skills, even as late as two years after the injury. Disrupting this development because of a concussion can lead to long-term problems with processing information, problem solving, decision-making, judgment and emotional control. These deficits, if properly managed, can be largely reversed, given appropriate and timely treatment and proper brain training, no matter time period since injury.
  • Harness the power of plasticity.The brain is the most modifiable part of the whole body and it can grow, change, heal and be trained in health or after injury. The brain is remarkably regenerative, but proper training is required to harness its intrinsic capacity to be rewired.
  • There is no time limit. It was previously believed that the window for brain recovery was at most one year after injury; my research has shown that the brain can be repaired months and years after injury if the right interventions are applied. If an athlete suffers a concussion, brain training can maximize cognitive performance. Unacceptably, the hundreds of thousands who have suffered concussions are living with less than their personal best, not rebounding to their maximum, high-performance potential.

I am inspired by the words of a Navy SEAL with whom I recently worked.

“Advances in modern medicine, science, and exercise physiology have taken our athletes to accomplishments that ten years ago were considered impossible. Ussan Bolt ran faster than any human alive at the Olympic games. Mark Inglis climbed Mount Everest on two prosthetic legs. We are growing stronger, and going faster, longer and higher than ever before.

Do you realize that the winner of a contest whether it is physical or mental is the one that has endured the most pain in training? The champions of the world are the ones that accept the idea that no matter the cost they will sacrifice everything to win. Champions want to be champions, and winners are winners no matter what they are doing at the time. How far can we take the ability of our brains if we actually focused on training it like we do our bodies?

My training at the Center for BrainHealth taught me many things. One, that anyone can think smarter. Two, you can join the fight sharper than before. Three, none more important than this, I will not fail, and I can be better, stronger and smarter. Why? Because it’s up to me, and I will succeed."

We can achieve far greater good by training the brain in health and by repairing and retraining the brain after injury – even years after injury than by banning sports. Team sports provide positive benefits for individuals of all ages; team sports are a cost effective avenue and training ground for socialization, fun and important life lessons. Sports may be one of the most important activities to promote physical activity and to counteract the vulnerability and risk of addiction which is becoming all too common in early adolescence. The conversation surrounding concussions must change from one of fear, doom and gloom to one of resilience, recovery, safety and hope. 

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Keep Your Brain Sharp This Holiday Season | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Keep Your Brain Sharp This Holiday Season

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, December 10, 2012

Feeling stressed out this holiday season? Does your brain feel like Grand Central Station during rush hour? Are you on overload and overdrive? Follow these tips for keeping your brain fit during the holiday season and maximizing your cognitive performance.

 

 

  1. Rest during the holidays; even a quick nap invites mind renewal and innovation, so schedule periods of brain downtime to seek ‘a-ha’ moments.
  2. Practice sorting the essential from the trivial.  Make a list of your top 10 tasks/goals that you want to complete each day and identify the two items that are most pivotal to your success and sense of major accomplishment each day.
  3. Avoid brain drain. Limit multitasking; multitasking diminishes mental productivity, elevates brain fatigue, increases stress, impairs sleep patterns and reduces overall health by altering immune system.
  4. Give your brain a workout. Write down high-level take home messages to share with othersfrom articles, conversations, books and movies to strengthen your frontal lobe function and capacity to recall information.
  5. Practice strategic attention by restricting information download and overload. Instead, expand your ability to synthesize big ideas from select and trusted information sources and discuss deeper thoughts with others.
  6. Propel your mental prowess to new heights by mentally 'zooming out' to a 20,000 foot perspective to review your goals and directions for the new year and re-direct your actions as well as your team/family.
  7. Getting a new cell phone or computer this holiday season? Research shows that learning new technology builds and strengthens brain connections as you go from being a novice to an expert in using the device.
  8. Energize your brain this holiday season and avoid excessive sugar and alcohol. Eat a heart healthy diet; what’s good for your heart is good for your brain.
  9. Enhance the social brain: interact with others beyond social media by joining a club or a hobby group. Socializing with others about something you are passionate builds stronger neural connections and provides rich experiences to more adroitly negotiate complex social encounters.
  10. The holidays are a busy time. Our brain functions best when our environment is organized. Clear the clutter and stow your three key items in the same place every time you use them.
  11. Research shows that memory improves with exercise. Take a brisk walk after a holiday meal to increase blood flow to the region of the brain that controls memory.
  12. Our brain becomes less fit with age because we accept mental slippage. Make a New Year’s resolution to put your brain up front and center focus. You are never too young or too old to adopt brain health habits that challenge and enhance your brain to think and act smarter.

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Asperger’s Dropped from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Asperger’s Dropped from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, December 7, 2012

The American Psychiatric Association has announced that it is dropping the term Asperger’s from the manual that doctors use to diagnose patients with mental disorders. The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V, or DSM-V, will lump Asperger’s and similar disorders into “autism spectrum disorder” versus separating the two.

Defining autism and the varying degrees on the spectrum has always been complicated. As the fastest growing developmental disability with an annual growth rate of 10-17%, the symptoms of autism differ from individual to individual.

“The new DSM-V guidelines will reduce the number of children and adults who are being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD),” said Dr. Nyaz Didehbani who works on BrainHealth’s social cognition team. “The change in diagnosis does narrow who gets classified as having Autism Spectrum, however the DSM is truly just a guide to diagnosing. Diagnosticians will have to interpret the new guidelines and use their clinical judgment to make informed decisions about treatment options for patients."

“The differences between the DSM-IV and DSM-V will most likely affect those that are ‘high-functioning’ therefore research should be targeted towards elucidating the variances among the high-functioning ASD group,” said Dr. Daniel Krawczyck, who also studies autism’s cognitive effects. “Imaging data supports brain structural differences -- cortical folding and possibly grey matter mass -- between Autism and Asperger’s.”

While there are positives to the change in guidelines such as limiting over-diagnosing and a clearer, more precise description of Autism Spectrum Disorder, there are also drawbacks.

“Dropping the term Asperger’s could potentially reduce access to services for those who are in need and delay early intervention and possible improvement for those that are mildly affected,” said clinician Tandra Allen who works daily with autism participants involved in BrainHealth’s social cognition research. “Overall, the label of Asperger’s or autism should not be the only restrictive or defining element that can describe an individual’s potential.”

Those on the autism spectrum are often poorly understood because of impaired “social cognition.” Individuals diagnosed with autism have difficulty observing social rules, participating in social routines, or understanding and expressing emotions. Scientists at the Center for BrainHealth are examining ways to improve life-enhancing social cognition skills in a host of populations, including those with autism disorders. Center researchers clinically evaluate the ability to strengthen or repair social brain networks in the aforementioned groups, impacting social behavior involved in complex social interactions absolutely vital for success in life. To learn more about BrainHealth’s social cognition research, click here.

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A Veteran Connection | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

A Veteran Connection

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, December 6, 2012

Eleanor Covan recently wrote a poignant article in The VVA Veteran titled, “Lost and Found Connections: Vietnam Veterans' Struggle to Come Home.” She states, “The bottom line is that a review of the lives of Vietnam veterans reveals the strength that arises from their connection to one another. Their desire to help others, especially other veterans, is a conscious mechanism to help themselves as well as others.“ Dr. Reid Lyon,  a Distinguished Scholar in Cognition and Neuroscience at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas couldn't agree more. Below he describes his experience returning to civilian life after Vietnam and how military service experience transcends generations.

When I turned 18 I volunteered to become an Army paratrooper and served 15 months in Vietnam in an airborne recon unit.  I arrived in Vietnam on February 14, 1968 and was immediately deployed with my unit to Hue City. Our task was to sweep west to east into the Hue/ Phu Bai area of operations and intercept and kill NVA troops attempting to reinforce regiments fighting the marines in Hue City and to kill those attempting to flee the city. The time between arrival in country and my first firefight was no more than three days and the shock and memory of this first combat experience is indelibly imprinted in my memory. Given the urgency of getting to Hue, we did not have time for in-country indoctrination. Despite my training in the states, I could not fathom that someone was actually trying to kill me.

We were in frequent contact during the period February 14 to March 20, 1968. In April through August, 1968 my recon unit was shifted west of Hue for operations in and around the Ashau Valley. In September, 1968 my unit detached from operations in I Corps and were tasked for operations northwest of Saigon (e.g., Cu Chi, Tay Ninh, Iron Triangle, Hobo Woods, etc.). Given my small stature and my job (recon) I spent a good deal of time inside tunnels which were ubiquitous in the CU Chi area. These experiences continue to weigh heavily on my spirit. I departed VN in May 30, 1969 and returned to duty at Fort Bragg, NC where I served the rest of my enlistment with the 82nd Airborne Division. I mention this background only because it served to distance me from my non-veteran friends and colleagues even to this day.

 

Following my military service I used the GI Bill to attend undergraduate and graduate school and post-doctoral training in neuroscience. Upon entering college 1970 during the height of the anti-war movement I felt very isolated and unwilling to let my peers know that I had served in Vietnam. I was one of the very few students who had been in the military, much less in combat. Hiding my service from my classmates only exacerbated my feelings of isolation and not only disconnected me from others but from myself. Why did I not have the courage to let people know I had fought in the war, when, in actually, I felt my service was very honorable? I had fought hard for those immediately around me and them for me. I also knew that I would serve again in combat if asked. It boggles my mind today to see how I was willing to remain silent in hopes that I could establish connections with my classmates. And, to make it worse, even if I did form connections, I would have had to hide my anger and bitterness over what I perceived as the clear hypocrisy displayed by many of my fellow students.

Accurate or not, I felt that their protestations were disingenuous and were more of a context for social interaction with a focus on getting stoned and laid, rather than any sincere motivation to support a moral cause to end the conflict. I am somewhat embarrassed to admit that I still carry these resentments today.

I have often wondered whether other combat vets who left the Vietnam War and immediately entered the unbelievable alienating contrast of college were affected in similar ways and whether their disconnections extended to the workplace. My chosen profession is not one where I come into contact with fellow combat vets – In fact, over the past three decades I can count on one hand the number of individuals that I have worked with either in the university setting or during my 14-year tenure at the National Institutes of Health that served in combat in Vietnam. Indeed, my colleagues of similar age have been and continue to be surprised that I served in Vietnam – It is something that does not compute for many of them – and expectedly so. Unfortunately, combat is something you have to experience to get it at a visceral level. To this day many of my non-vet colleagues who wore the uniform of their youth (jeans with holes and patches; beads; long hair, etc.) look fondly back at their college years as a time of little responsibility or restraint. To them the war was, and still is, an abstraction. Surprisingly, many of my age-mates confide in me today that they actually gave little thought to those fighting in Vietnam or to the political and moral aspects of the conflict. For many, their war, in part, was against the practice of making money and purchasing external symbols of the establishment – practices which many embrace today. The majority of my college classmates now evaluate their lives on the basis of external measures and indicators of success that they eschewed and protested vehemently during the war years. I may be unfair, but I observe that unbridled ambition among my generation is probably more common than service to others.  Indeed, it would be interesting to learn of the beliefs and actions of my classmates who played the angles to avoid the draft during the late 60’s and early 70’s who then went on to make fortunes on Wall Street.  As I write this, I am again embarrassed by my difficulties accepting the non-connections of my past.

But despite years of anguish, I have found that my strength of being arises from my connection with fellow veterans. The instant connection I feel with other combat veterans is amazing to me. It is as if I can sense their intensity and experience even before I know they fought and saw the horrors of combat. There is some type of emotional shorthand that cuts through the social intercourse no matter how we have dealt with the demons or what we do for a living. In many cases I see a weird wisdom and sense of depth I do not see among my non-combat age-mates but I know this is a highly-biased observation. I am at most peace when I visit the VA for treatment. Just being in the presence of fellow veterans lifts my spirits. 

I have shifted my research focus from studying brain development in children to working with young vets back from Iraq and Afghanistan who suffer from traumatic brain injury and PTS. I feel at home with them and I find they are comfortable with me. They tell me I have “street cred”. I tell them my efforts are as much for me as they are for them. I tell them that they help to me become less resentful of my age-mates and they understand that is not easy for me to do despite the destructive and selfish nature of that emotion. Hopefully, they will experience a world of genuine connection with others more rapidly than some of their Vietnam vet brothers and sisters.

For the past 30 years, Dr. G. Reid Lyon has had a wide range of professional responsibilities including his contributions as a researcher, professor, classroom teacher, special education teacher, school psychologist, and leader in the development of evidence-based education policy at the federal and state levels. He currently serves as a Distinguished Research Scholar at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas.

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Join the Brain Health Movement and Make Your Brain Smarter | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Join the Brain Health Movement and Make Your Brain Smarter

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Want to improve your brainpower? Thanks to the scientific study of the Center for BrainHealth’s founder and chief director, Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, that’s a Know Brainer. Dr. Chapman, in her career quest to maximize cognitive potential across the entire lifespan, revolutionizes the way we think about and care for our brains in a new book that publishes January 1.

Make Your Brain Smarter – Increase Your Brain’s Creativity, Energy, and Focus, written by Dr. Chapman, along with the Center’s public relations director Shelly Kirkland, condenses 30 years of research into a customizable brain health fitness guide designed to improve creative and critical thinking, strengthen healthy brain development, and incite innovation throughout life.

After taking you through a quick tour of your brain’s frontal lobe and introducing you to your cognitive CEO, the prefrontal cortex, Make Your Brain Smarter brings to light many reassuring actualities: aging does not equal brain slippage—cognitive health declines because we let it; near-perfect memory is NOT the definition of a robust brain; IQ is an outdated and misleading index of brain potential; and every individual can rewire their brain by how it is used everyday.

This energizing and empowering book includes nine strategies to keep your brain fit at any age; unique tests and exercises to boost your problem solving and higher-reasoning capacity; and secrets to becoming a higher brain performer.  “I wholeheartedly live by Sandi Chapman’s guide to making our brain smarter,” said Melissa Reiff, president of The Container Store. “The topic of brain health is critical to our future as we all want to continue to live strong, vibrant, and impactful lives for as long as we possibly can.”

Other book gems include memorable Know Brainer expressions at the end of each chapter – tips we should all know and adopt to keep our brains healthy. “These strategies revolutionized my life and could change the lives of millions. In the knowledge era, cognitive performance has never been more needed, but the distractions are great and growing. This book comes at the perfect time,” said Donovan Campbell, New York Times best selling author of Joker One and the upcoming book The Leader’s Code.

Make Your Brain Smarter is your guidebook to the worldwide Brain Health Movement. You are never too young or too old to commit to adopt beneficial brain health habits that challenge and enhance your brain’s capacity to think and act smarter.

“Thanks to the pioneering brain research being done by Dr. Sandi Chapman, we can have healthy an productive minds for far longer than we might have imagined,” said T. Boone Pickens, legendary entrepreneur, innovator, energy executive, and author of The First Billion is the Hardest: Reflections on a Life of Comebacks and America’s Energy Future.

Make Your Brain Smarter is available wherever books are sold.

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Schizophrenia: The Healing Potential of Knowing How to Navigate Social Relationships | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Schizophrenia: The Healing Potential of Knowing How to Navigate Social Relationships

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the U.S. population and 24 million people worldwide. It is a chronic and often debilitating brain disorder. Those who carry the diagnosis are often plagued by visual and auditory hallucinations, nonsensical speech, distorted sense of reality, emotional difficulty, paranoia, and other cognitive challenges.

Despite living a terrifying and confusing existence, many remain unaware of their illness. Scientists refer to this reduced ability to self-reflect or possess emotional awareness as a lack of insight, which may also be accompanied by a lack of empathy – the reduced ability to recognize or share other’s emotions. Most people with other forms of mental illness such as obsessive compulsive disorder and various phobias are aware of their differences and therefore are able recognize their limitations, however, in schizophrenia, that is usually not the case.

A new study published in Schizophrenia Research by scientists at the Center for BrainHealth, UT Southwestern, and UT Medical School at Houston is the first of its kind seeking to understand the relationship between insight and empathy in individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. Deficits in insight and empathy are significant because, in addition to the psychological and social challenges they create, they also predict a poor prognosis, and the combination can become socially isolating. Things like holding a job or sustaining meaningful life relationships become virtually impossible.

Previous research suggested that self-awareness is necessary to understand the perspective of others. Therefore, the collaborative team of researchers hypothesized that individuals with little insight into their own illness would also show little empathy for other's perspectives. To confirm this theory, the researchers compared 19 individuals diagnosed with either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder to a control group and used standard measures to evaluate insight, empathy and depressive symptoms.

“We thought that those with greater insight into their disease would exhibit greater empathy and awareness for other's perspectives than those with less insight,” said Center for BrainHealth researcher Nyaz Didehbani, Ph.D.  “However, we actually found the opposite. Schizophrenics with greater insight into their disorder showed decreased empathy toward others.” She continued, “It was surprising but makes sense. As you gain insight you think, I have so many problems. It’s genetic and I’m going to struggle with this for the rest of my life. The focus is on the self. Greater insight into the disease creates more hopelessness, social withdrawal and leads to depression. Being weighed down by depression then reduces the interest to have empathy towards others.”

Although the exact role of empathy on insight requires further investigation, study uncovered that in the schizophrenic population high insight predicts low empathy. These findings promise to help further the advancement of future treatment approaches.

Dr. Didehbani and the Center for BrainHealth team also work with individuals who have autism, another group of people who experience difficulty with empathy. Like those with schizophrenia, individuals with autism not only have difficulty recognizing and interpreting human emotion, but also knowing how to respond appropriately.  In a related Center for BrainHealth study, researchers used virtual reality training to improve social cognition in those diagnosed with autism. Dr. Didehbani believes the related study’s success may translate well for individuals with schizophrenia who experience social skill deficits as a result of their challenges with empathy. “Pharmaceutical treatments manage hallucinations of schizophrenia relatively well, however mood issues like depression, which are often exacerbated by social isolation, are harder to treat,” she explained.

 “Social cognition training, in which participants practice navigating social situations such as a meeting new people or interviewing for a job using a virtual reality platform, will help individuals with schizophrenia learn to recognize emotions and respond appropriately to others. Improving social skills like these can help lift the social isolation barrier that may aggravate depressive symptoms.”

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Studying Overeating as a Type of Addiction | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Studying Overeating as a Type of Addiction

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Monday, November 26, 2012

A similar, insidious craving plagues all addicts, no matter the substance of choice. A new study published in NeuroImage from Center for BrainHealth scientists Dr. Francesca Filbey, assistant professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and doctoral student Samuel DeWitt has found that for binge-eaters, as with all addiction sufferers, the compulsion to overeat is rooted in the brain’s reward center.

In the last 20 years, the incidence of obesity has doubled in the U.S. and many European countries, and related chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes are on the rise. One-third of Americans are obese, and more than two-thirds are overweight. Obesity has become a leading health problem in the United States, and its challenging personal and economic ramifications fuel the desire to quell the pandemic.

Until now research and treatment focusing on physiological factors, such as metabolic disorders, and psychological causes, such as eating when depressed or bored, have failed to solve the problem. However, recent research from Center for BrainHealth’s lead addiction scientist, Dr. Filbey, seeks to further understand how addiction manifests in the brain and drive innovative treatment solutions.

“The reason I’m interested in studying the brain’s reward system in response to food is that current treatments for obesity often do not work. Only 5 percent of those who seek interventions such as diet and exercise are successful in maintaining a healthy weight. Even in the case of gastric bypass, many still experience dependence symptoms like extreme desire to overeat and the associated feelings of guilt after surgery,” Filbey said.

“For someone with addiction, they are constantly bombarded by temptation, which is triggered by cues. For someone with an alcohol addiction, a cue might be driving down the road and seeing a bar or just seeing a wine glass. For someone who has problems with food, it might be the image of a milkshake or the smell of popcorn. Constant cues or triggers are what often makes it very difficult to abstain from substances,” Filbey said.

Filbey
and her team examined 26 obese individuals who exhibited binge-eating symptoms without purging behaviors. Obese is defined as having a body mass index above 30. Binge-eating symptoms were measured using a questionnaire called the Binge Eating Scale. All participants had moderate to severe binge eating behavior.

Participants were asked to divulge their favorite high-calorie beverages and complete self-assessments about their eating behavior. Using functional MRI technology, researchers then observed each participant’s brain while the chosen, high-calorie beverage was piped into the participant’s mouth.

As researchers suspected, the brain showed heightened activity in the reward, motivation, and memory areas of the brain. The more severe the binge-eating symptoms exhibited by the participant, the greater the activity in the brain. The results demonstrate similarities between brain disorders of the reward system commonly seen in other forms of addiction and binge eating.

Despite the cognitive connection between addiction and obesity, the term “food addiction” is up for debate in the field. “It is not a concept people have been open to in the past. Right now, it does not exist as a recognized disorder.” However, Filbey concedes, “The National Institute on Drug Abuse has begun supporting research into food addiction, and although previously not considered a legitimate diagnosis, the next Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders will list binge eating as a disorder.”

This study provides evidence that the solution to weight loss for some goes beyond preaching behavior changes such as “just say no” to another milkshake, and urges us to better understand brain-based issues that lead to obesity. Further research into binge eating, addiction, and the brain’s reward system will help identify risk factors for weight problems and provide the basis for treatments helping those who struggle with “food addiction”.

The National Institutes of Health recently awarded Filbey $2 million to study addiction and marijuana.

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Q&A with Dr. Hsueh-Sheng Chiang | Center for BrainHealth
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Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Q&A with Dr. Hsueh-Sheng Chiang

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, November 15, 2012

How do you feel about receiving the Linda & Joel Robuck Friends of BrainHealth Distinguished New Scientist Award?

I am honored to receive the Linda and Joel Robuck Friends of BrainHealth Distinguished New Scientist Award. This opportunity will advance my research goals and further establish my work in the field of cognitive neuroscience. My ultimate goal is to discover ways to improve the brain health of the aging population through sophisticated scientific study.

How will this grant further your research?

My research aims to detect the beginnings of cognitive deterioration before it develops into mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer’s disease. Using electroencephalography (EEG), I hope to identify brain biomarkers that demonstrate minimal changes in brain function due to disease. The Linda and Joel Robuck Friends of BrainHealth Distinguished New Scientists Award will allow me to recruit individuals from an aging population and analyze slight differences in the brain that may be associated with a higher risk of MCI or dementia. Through the identification of these early indicators of cognitive degeneration, doctors can intervene and administer treatment before it is too late.

How did you become interested in neuroscience?

My interest in neuroscience grew through my time spent at medical school in Taiwan. Over the seven year program, the breadth of unresolved mysteries of the brain perplexed me. There are still a vast number of brain diseases that require exploration and investigation.

What do you enjoy most about the Center for BrainHealth?

The supportive environment of the Center for BrainHealth has made my transition to the United States easier. People at the Center for BrainHealth welcomed me to the team immediately, and the scientists and clinicians collaborate and share resources to formulate dynamic solutions.

How would you describe yourself?

I would describe myself as someone who enjoys the learning process. I strive to enjoy the moment, even when the answers seem unclear. Furthermore, I like to think of myself as a self-motivated and dedicated individual.

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“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Many believe if something is working adequately well, leave it alone. But for our brains, adequate is not good enough.

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A Service Member’s Perspective | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

A Service Member’s Perspective

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Friday, November 9, 2012

An active duty Navy SEAL who participated in BrainHealth's high performance brain training shares his story.

"Advances in modern medicine, science, and exercise physiology have taken our athletes to accomplishments that ten years ago were considered impossible. Ussan Bolt ran faster than any human alive at the Olympic games. Mark Inglis climbed Mount Everest on two prosthetic legs. We are growing stronger, and going faster, longer and higher than ever before.

Do you realize that the winner of a contest whether it is physical or mental is the one that has endured the most pain in training? The champions of the world are the ones that accept the idea that no matter the cost they will sacrifice everything to win. Champions want to be champions, and winners are winners no matter what they are doing at the time. How far can we take the ability of our brains if we actually focused on training it like we do our bodies?

My training at the Center for BrainHealth taught me many things. One, that anyone can think smarter. Two, you can join the fight sharper than before. Three, none more important than this, I will not fail, and I can be better, stronger and smarter. Why? Because it’s up to me, and I will succeed."

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“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Many believe if something is working adequately well, leave it alone. But for our brains, adequate is not good enough.

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Q&A with Nick Hubbard | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Q&A with Nick Hubbard

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Thursday, November 1, 2012

How do you feel about receiving the Friends of BrainHealth “Distinguished New Scientist” award?

I am ecstatic! I’ve been given an incredible opportunity as a young researcher to pursue my passion and contribute to the current and future studies of brain health.

What made you decide to focus on understanding depression in the brain, and rumination in particular?

The prevalence of depression in our country is staggering. It is a phenomenon that has not received sufficient attention or research, and the negative effects of depression continue to significantly affect people’s quality of life. I am focused on rumination, or the perseverance of negative thoughts, in depressed individuals. If we can find and understand the rumination center of the brain, we can help people break out of their negative thought cycle, reallocate their attention, and subsequently live happier lives.

How have you been influenced by the Center?

I am so fortunate to work with my advisor, Dr.Rypma. His work has greatly influenced my career, and his mentorship has given me incredible opportunities in learning innovative brain research. Furthermore, the Center for BrainHealth is a unique place that applies scientific research that benefits individuals in real time. It is inspiring to work at the Center where clinicians, researchers and medical doctors integrate their knowledge and collaborate on studies to positively affect people’s lives every day.

If you could be known for one thing in the scientific world in 20 years what would it be?

I would be thrilled to one day be known as the person that helped alleviate the very large toll that rumination takes on depressed individuals.

What are three adjectives that you would use to describe yourself?

Driven. Goal-oriented. Happy.

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“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Many believe if something is working adequately well, leave it alone. But for our brains, adequate is not good enough.

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Daryl “Moose” Johnston and Lee Roy Jordan Receive Center for BrainHealth’s Legacy Award | Center for BrainHealth
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As we live longer lives, we should all be concerned with the greatest human asset—our mental capacity.

Dianne Cash, BrainHealth Leadership Council

BrainHealth

Daryl “Moose” Johnston and Lee Roy Jordan Receive Center for BrainHealth’s Legacy Award

By: The Center for BrainHealth
Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas presented Daryl “Moose” Johnston and Lee Roy Jordan with its highest honor, the Legacy Award, on October 23, 2012. The BrainHealth Legacy Award recognizes the pioneering spirit of individuals whose vision and dedication to brain research enable the Center to explore the vast potential of the human mind.

“My goal in creating the Center for BrainHealth was to apply our novel, evidence-based training programs to make a difference in people’s lives,” said Dr. Sandra B. Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth. “Daryl and Lee Roy adopted that mission and have dedicated themselves to changing the conversation about concussions away from one of doom and gloom to one of hope, recovery and high performance.”

The two former Dallas Cowboys have encouraged athletes of all ages to take charge of their brain health and have empowered individuals to focus on the remarkable power and potential of the brain to be rewired across the lifespan. With their leadership, more than three dozen former NFL players and other professional athletes have taken a proactive step to maximize their cognitive potential.

“Having played 11 years in the NFL and taking countless hits, I’ve heard about the struggles of the players that came before me and the challenges regarding their quality of life,” Johnston said. “Through the Center for BrainHealth, former players can find out if there is an issue, and if you catch it early or late, there are things you can do to improve your condition. The brain is regenerative for life, and we can restore faculties that just a few years ago were thought to be lost forever.”

“I really wanted to be involved with the Center’s mission, and I felt like I could be a leader again and get other people involved, “ explained Jordan. “It’s great to see the energy and knowledge the Center for BrainHealth team has that they are putting to work to benefit athletes of all ages and our brave military men and women.”

The BrainHealth Legacy Award dinner was held at the Dallas Country Club. Dinner chairs Barry Andrews and Alan White, along with event chair Julie Hawes, made the night a memorable one. The host committee included Allie Beth and Pierce Allman, Kelli and Gerald Ford, Debbie and Jim Francis, Gene and Jerry Jones, Ellen and John McStay, T. Boone Pickens, Terry and Bob Rowling, and Marianne and Roger Staubach. The evening’s master of ceremonies was Brad Sham, radio host and “Voice of the Dallas Cowboys.”

“Before if you had a concussion or got hurt, you just thought you rested and got over it,” said Alan White, Legacy Dinner Chair. “But there are other techniques now that can help repair it, and those are the things the Center provides. Daryl and Lee Roy are not only great football players. They’ve been great role models for so many people.”

“I can’t think of two more deserving individuals to be honored,” said Barry Andrews, Legacy Dinner Chair. “Lee Roy and Daryl are not only friends, but men I respect greatly. I applaud them for leading the way for past and future players to be totally fit – both while playing and after retirement.”

Past BrainHealth Legacy Award recipients include Dianne Cash, Debbie Francis, T. Boone Pickens, James Huffines and Dee Wyly.

The BrainHealth Legacy Award Dinner raised more than to $600,000 to support the Center’s life-changing research.

Major donors include:

$100,000

The Umphrey Family

 

$50,000

Dee Wyly

 

$25,000

Lana and Barry Andrews

Julie and Ed Hawes

Al G. Hill, Jr.

Gene and Jerry Jones and Family

T. Boone Pickens

Terry and Bob Rowling

Lee Ann and Alan White / PlainsCapital Bank

 

$15,000

Renee and Hill A. Feinberg

 

$10,000

Allie Beth and Pierce Allman

Moshe Azoulay

Baylor Health Care System

Dianne Cash

Ernst & Young

Kelli and Gerald Ford / Hilltop Holdings

Haynes and Boone, LLP

Highland Capital Management

Lincoln Property Company

Ellen and John McStay

Sammye and Mike Myers

Betsy and Jim Sowell

Tolleson Wealth Management

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“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Many believe if something is working adequately well, leave it alone. But for our brains, adequate is not good enough.

Continue Reading

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