17 Ways to Age-Proof Your Brain

Monday, June 26, 2017


Here are some tips Dr. Sandra Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth, provides for enhancing your brain health:

Read More of Less

Reading, in general, is good for the brain. But reading fewer books and articles so you can give them each of them more focused attention may be even better. "Our brain doesn't do very well with too much information. The more you download, the more it shuts the brain down," says Sandra Bond Chapman, PhD, director of the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas at Dallas. "It's better to read one or two good articles and think about them in a deeper sense rather than read 20."


Single-Task

If you think your ability to multitask proves you've got a strong brain, think again. "Multitasking hijacks your frontal lobe," says Chapman, who is also the author of Make Your Brain Smarter. The frontal lobe regulates decision-making, problem-solving, and other aspects of learning that are critical to maintaining brain health. Research has shown that doing one thing at a time-not everything at once-strengthens higher-order reasoning, or the ability to learn, understand, and apply new information.


Use your time wisely

Don't spend an hour doing something that should take you 10 minutes. Conversely, don't spend 10 minutes on something that deserves an hour. In other words, calibrate your mental energy. "Decide from the get-go how much mental energy you are going to spend on a task," says Chapman. "Giving your full forceful energy all the time really degrades resources. You need to know when to do something fast and when to do something slow."

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