News Articles

Brain health program aims to help police deal better with stressful situations

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

With police officers often facing extreme stress and trauma on a regular basis, the program created by the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas provides weeks of cognitive training to make officers' minds sharper and more balanced.

A year after slayings, Dallas police train in ‘mindfulness’

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Center for BrainHealth partners with the Dallas Police Department to provide 500 officers with training thanks to gift from Dallas philanthropist Lyda Hill.

17 Ways to Age-Proof Your Brain

Monday, June 26, 2017

More and more research finds that a host of activities can help keep our brains young even as we advance in chronological age. Dr. Chapman provides three practical tips for enhancing your brain health as you age.

QUIZ: Do you have an internet addiction?

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Are you addicted to the internet? Dr. Jacque Gamino, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Center for BrainHealth, shared a quiz with WFAA that can measure your level of internet addiction. She says 6-8 hours a day of screen time is likely borderline addictive.

Verify: Can kids get addicted to screens?

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Dr. Jacque Gamino sat down with David Schechter of WFAA's Verify to discuss the cognitive impacts of too much screen time for adolescents.

Study finds way to predict treatment effectiveness for adults with autism

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas and the George Washington University have identified certain brain regions that significantly correlate with an increase in social abilities following a virtual environment based training program. Adults on the autism spectrum who showed greater activity in the social brain network prior to the training improved more in emotion recognition than those who showed less activity.

Predicting treatment effectiveness for adults with autism

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

A collaboration between the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas and the George Washington University created a protocol to predict individual treatment effectiveness for adults on the autism spectrum. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the researchers identified certain brain regions that significantly correlate with an increase in social abilities following a virtual environment based training program. Adults on the autism spectrum who showed greater activity in the social brain network prior to the training improved more in emotion recognition than those who showed less activity.

7 Surprising Real-World Uses for Virtual Reality

Thursday, May 25, 2017

A 2016 study from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas found that some individuals with autism spectrum disorder were able to improve social cognition skills and even reported better real-world relationships after participating in a VR training program.

Strategy-based brain training changes cortical thickness, neural connectivity in adults with TBI

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Findings from a recent study from the Center for BrainHealth, published in Brain and Behavior, further suggest that changes in cortical thickness and neural network connectivity may prove an effective way to quantitatively measure treatment efficacy, an ability that has not existed until now.

Strategic brain training positively affects neural connectivity for individuals with TBI

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

A recent study from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that a certain type of instructor-led brain training protocol can stimulate structural changes in the brain and neural connections even years after a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

7 simple ways to sharpen your mind and improve your life (backed by science)

Friday, May 12, 2017

Dr. Chapman provides insight on how multitasking, information overload and constant interruptions affect our brains.

University Celebrates Benefactors, Newest Endowed Chairs at Investiture Ceremony

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Dr. Francesca Filbey, whose research at the Center for BrainHealth focuses on the causes and consequences of addiction, was one of the 13 faculty members recognized at the University's Investiture Ceremony. Dr. Filbey was named the Bert Moore Chair BrainHealth, which honors the legacy of longtime university dean who passed away in 2015.

Neuroscientists take new approach to addiction research with focus on quantifying craving

Thursday, May 4, 2017

A new article in JAMA Psychiatry details the first step in revealing how craving works in the brain. Scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas are the first to propose a systematic and quantitative model for drug addiction research.

Neuroscientists seek brain basis of craving in addiction and binge eating

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Drs. Gu and Filbey of the Center for BrainHealth are collaborating to identify – using a new computational model – the exact regions of the brain that encode craving.

Neuroscientists seek brain basis of craving in addiction and binge eating

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

A new article in JAMA Psychiatry details the first step in revealing how craving works in the brain. Scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas are the first to propose a systematic and quantitative model for drug addiction research.

How Exercise Can Benefit Your Brain

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

New research finds regular workouts can improve brain function--even in those with memory loss. Dr. Dianna Jaffin, PhD, director of strategy and programs at the Brain Performance Institute comments on the findings.

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